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Latest Population genetics Stories

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2009-12-21 14:39:25

Collaboration by University of Pennsylvania and Cornell University People who identify as African-American may be as little as 1 percent West African or as much as 99 percent, just one finding of a large-scale, genome-wide study of African and African-American ancestry released today. An international research team led by scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell University has collected and analyzed genotype data from 365 African-Americans, 203 people from 12 West African...

2009-12-15 12:54:19

A team of researchers, at Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, has identified a group of 12 genetic variants in the HSPB7 gene that is associated with heart failure in humans. The team, led by Gerald Dorn, used an approach they have recently developed that allows ultra-high-throughput targeted DNA sequencing to identify genetic variation in four genes with biological relevance to heart failure. They identified in a large group of Caucasian individuals with heart failure, 129...

2009-12-10 14:04:01

73 Southeast Asian and East Asian populations genetically mapped Several genome-wide studies of human genetic diversity have been conducted on European populations. Now, for the first time, these studies have been extended to 73 Southeast Asian (SEA) and East Asian (EA) populations. In a paper titled, "Mapping Human Genetic Diversity in Asia," published online Science on 10 Dec. 2009, over 90 scientists from the Human Genome Organisation's (HUGO's) Pan-Asian SNP Consortium report that their...

2009-12-02 18:16:33

Looks can be deceiving, but certain bird species have figured out that a voice can tell them most of what they need to know to find the right mate. Andrew DeWoody, a Purdue University associate professor of forestry and natural resources, found that the higher the pitch of a male bird's song, the more genetic diversity that bird has, making him a better mate for breeding. His study was published Wednesday (Dec. 2) in the early online edition of PLoS Biology. "If you have a diverse set of...

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2009-10-29 05:50:00

Evolutionary outcomes can be influenced by culture as well as genes, according to a new study released on Wednesday comparing societies around the world. Natural and social sciences are rarely brought together, but the study analyzed the interaction across 29 countries of two sets of data, genetic and cultural. The researchers discovered that the majority of people living in countries considered to be collectivist have a certain mutation within a gene that regulates the transport of...

2009-10-27 09:13:29

Alcohol abuse is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis in Mexico. Given that genetics likely play a role in high rates of alcoholic liver disease, researchers analyzed the polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1B), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) and cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) in two groups in Mexico: the Mestizos, those with mixed genes, and the Huichols, an indigenous group with no racial admixture. Findings show the Huichols have the highest CYP2E1*c2 allele frequency documented in the...

2009-10-12 15:25:00

Culture is more important than genes to altruistic behavior in large-scale societies Socially learned behavior and belief are much better candidates than genetics to explain the self-sacrificing behavior we see among strangers in societies, from soldiers to blood donors to those who contribute to food banks. This is the conclusion of a study by Adrian V. Bell and colleagues from the University of California Davis in the Oct. 12 edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences....

2009-10-07 09:11:37

Study explores how farmers' practice affects role of gene flow between cultivated sorghum and its weedy relatives Family can be a blessing and a curse, and never more so than in the case of crop plants and their wild relatives. These wild and weedy relatives harbor unique and beneficial genes that may no longer be found in their cultivated siblings, but they also harbor genetic traits that farmers have intentionally selected against in their domesticated brethren. The close genetic...

2009-09-20 12:33:00

REYKJAVIK, Iceland, September 20 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- - Findings Further Increase Power of DNA-Based Testing to Identify Men at Substantially Increased Risk, and Will be Integrated Into the deCODE ProstateCancer(TM) Test deCODE genetics (Nasdaq:DCGN) today announced that a team of its scientists and academic colleagues from Finland, Spain, the Netherlands and the United States have today published the discovery of four novel single-letter variations in the sequence of the...

2009-09-02 23:50:00

A third of the previously identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, associated with prostate cancer in men of European or African ancestry were also associated with prostate cancer in a Japanese population, according to a new study published online September 2 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Genome-wide association studies have primarily been performed in populations of European ancestry, but little is known if the associations discovered in one population are...


Latest Population genetics Reference Libraries

House Mouse, Mus musculus
2012-05-01 11:42:07

Even in the wild, this rodent is associated with humans by destroying crops and stored food. The house mouse is also known as the fancy mouse, a common pet. It is also a widely used laboratory animal, important for testing in genetics, biology, and medicine. There are three recognized subspecies of the house mouse. These mice thrive in a number of locations including fields, houses, and commercial structures. An adult male house mouse can have a body length of up to 3.9 in, and tail length...

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Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'