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Latest Population genetics Stories

2009-08-14 10:41:24

At one time or another most of us wonder where we came from, where our parents or grandparents and their parents came from.  Did our ancestors come from Europe or Asia?  As curious as we are about our ancestors, for practical purposes, we need to think about the ancestry of our genes, according to Cecil Lewis, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Oklahoma.  Lewis says our genetic ancestry influences the genetic traits that predispose us to risk or resistance...

2009-07-22 08:57:07

Genetic research indicates that Australian Aborigines initially arrived via south Asia. Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology have found telltale mutations in modern-day Indian populations that are exclusively shared by Aborigines.Dr Raghavendra Rao worked with a team of researchers from the Anthropological Survey of India to sequence 966 complete mitochondrial DNA genomes from Indian 'relic populations'. He said, "Mitochondrial DNA is inherited only from the...

2009-07-13 12:20:00

REYKJAVIK, Iceland, July 13 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Scientists at deCODE genetics (Nasdaq: DCGN) and colleagues from Europe and the United States today report the discovery of a common single-letter variant in the sequence of the human genome (SNP) conferring increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) and stroke. The findings will be integrated directly into the deCODE AF(TM) reference laboratory test for gauging individual risk of AF and stroke and helping to identify stroke patients...

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2009-07-09 07:41:14

South Korean geneticists have recently finished sequencing the genome of a Korean male "” the fifth fully-sequenced human to date "” and have stumbled upon a number of genetic variations they say may lead to a predisposition to several forms of cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and a variety of other genetically influenced diseases. In a summary of their work, published this week in the scientific journal Nature, the scientists detailed how they exploited new technological advances in...

2009-07-06 15:11:39

Mayo Clinic and University of California-San Francisco medical researchers say they have found a connection between DNA alterations and brain cancer. The scientists say they found a linkage between DNA variations on human chromosome 9 and aggressive brain cancer known as glioblastoma. The study, conducted with different patient populations at each institution, looked for genome-wide associations. The researchers said they found that people with the specific DNA alterations -- also known as...

2009-07-06 06:07:00

REYKJAVIK, Iceland, July 6 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Scientists at deCODE genetics (Nasdaq: DCGN) and academic colleagues from Europe and the United States today present in the journal Nature Genetics the discovery of common genetic risk factors for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that affect people with fair and dark complexions alike. deCODE had previously discovered five common single-letter variants in the sequence of the human genome (SNPs) linked to risk of BCC, the most common cancer in...

2009-07-01 16:10:06

The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) known as 2q35-rs13387042 is associated with increased risk of estrogen receptor (ER) -positive and -negative breast cancer, according to a study published online July 1 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.This study was undertaken to confirm previous research that identified this SNP as a marker of susceptibility to ER"“positive breast cancer.Roger L. Milne, Ph.D., of the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol³gicas in Madrid,...

2009-07-01 12:20:00

REYKJAVIK, Iceland, July 1 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- The largest study of the genetics of schizophrenia ever undertaken has revealed several new common single-letter variants in the sequence of the human genome (SNPs) linked to risk of the disease. The study, by a multinational consortium of scientists led by a team from deCODE genetics (Nasdaq:DCGN), analyzed the genomes of more than 50,000 patients and control participants from fourteen countries. It is published today in the online...

2009-06-30 09:09:22

Avoidance of inbreeding is evident amongst humans, and has been demonstrated in some shorebirds, mice and sand lizards. Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology now report that it also occurs in a strictly monogamous species of bird, suggesting that the black-legged kittiwake possesses the ability to choose partners with a very different genetic profile.The study, led by Richard H. Wagner from the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Ethology of the Austrian Academy of...

2009-06-29 18:00:00

An Austrian-led study has found the black-legged kittiwake bird, a monogamous species, has the ability to choose partners with a different genetic profile. The researchers, led by Richard Wagner from the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Ethology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, said avoidance of inbreeding is evident among humans, and has been demonstrated in some shorebirds, mice and sand lizards. Now the black-legged kittiwake has been added to that list. The scientists said they tracked 10...


Latest Population genetics Reference Libraries

House Mouse, Mus musculus
2012-05-01 11:42:07

Even in the wild, this rodent is associated with humans by destroying crops and stored food. The house mouse is also known as the fancy mouse, a common pet. It is also a widely used laboratory animal, important for testing in genetics, biology, and medicine. There are three recognized subspecies of the house mouse. These mice thrive in a number of locations including fields, houses, and commercial structures. An adult male house mouse can have a body length of up to 3.9 in, and tail length...

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