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Latest Population genetics Stories

2009-07-01 16:10:06

The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) known as 2q35-rs13387042 is associated with increased risk of estrogen receptor (ER) -positive and -negative breast cancer, according to a study published online July 1 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.This study was undertaken to confirm previous research that identified this SNP as a marker of susceptibility to ER"“positive breast cancer.Roger L. Milne, Ph.D., of the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol³gicas in Madrid,...

2009-07-01 12:20:00

REYKJAVIK, Iceland, July 1 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- The largest study of the genetics of schizophrenia ever undertaken has revealed several new common single-letter variants in the sequence of the human genome (SNPs) linked to risk of the disease. The study, by a multinational consortium of scientists led by a team from deCODE genetics (Nasdaq:DCGN), analyzed the genomes of more than 50,000 patients and control participants from fourteen countries. It is published today in the online...

2009-06-30 09:09:22

Avoidance of inbreeding is evident amongst humans, and has been demonstrated in some shorebirds, mice and sand lizards. Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology now report that it also occurs in a strictly monogamous species of bird, suggesting that the black-legged kittiwake possesses the ability to choose partners with a very different genetic profile.The study, led by Richard H. Wagner from the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Ethology of the Austrian Academy of...

2009-06-29 18:00:00

An Austrian-led study has found the black-legged kittiwake bird, a monogamous species, has the ability to choose partners with a different genetic profile. The researchers, led by Richard Wagner from the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Ethology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, said avoidance of inbreeding is evident among humans, and has been demonstrated in some shorebirds, mice and sand lizards. Now the black-legged kittiwake has been added to that list. The scientists said they tracked 10...

2009-06-08 09:25:07

U.S. biologists have found the loss of pelvises and body armor in two species of stickleback fish was caused by different genes. The finding surprised University of Utah researchers, who expected the same genes would control the same evolutionary changes in both related fish. We knew that in many cases of evolution, the same gene has been used over and over again -- even in different species -- to give the same anatomy, Assistant Professor Mike Shapiro said. What we are finding now is that...

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2009-06-05 08:30:00

New research indicates that natural selection may shape the human genome much more slowly than previously thought. Other factors -- the movements of humans within and among continents, the expansions and contractions of populations, and the vagaries of genetic chance "“ have heavily influenced the distribution of genetic variations in populations around the world. The study, conducted by a team from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the University of Chicago, the University of...

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2009-05-25 10:25:00

A Brazilian study has found that people are subconsciously more likely to choose a partner whose genetic make-up is different to their own, further cementing the adage that opposites really do attract, Reuters reported. Married couples were found to be more likely to have genetic differences in a DNA region governing the immune system than were randomly matched pairs, the researchers said. Maria da Graca Bicalho and her colleagues at the University of Parana in Brazil reported that this was...

2009-05-25 09:27:55

Thank parasites for making some of our immune proteins into the inflammatory defenders they are today, according to a population genetics study that will appear in the June 8 issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine (online May 25). The study, conducted by a team of researchers in Italy, also suggests that you might blame parasites for sculpting some of those genes into risk factors for intestinal disorders. Parasite-driven selection leaves a footprint on our DNA in the form of mutations...

2009-05-17 13:24:00

Reykjavik, ICELAND, May 17 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- In a paper published today in the online edition of Nature Genetics, scientists from deCODE genetics (Nasdaq:DCGN) and academic colleagues from Iceland, Denmark and the Netherlands present the discovery of single letter variations in the sequence of the human genome (SNPs) that influence the age of girls at menarche, the first menstrual period. Age at menarche (AAM) is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, though the...

2009-04-30 19:20:39

A 10-year study of African population genetics has determined the continent is the most genetically diverse in the world, researchers said Thursday. The team headed by Sara Tishkoff, a geneticist at the University of Pennsylvania, determined that modern humans evolved in southern Africa on the border between Namibia and South Africa. They left the continent by way of East Africa at about the midpoint in the Red Sea. The research team collected data from 14 African populations, four...


Latest Population genetics Reference Libraries

House Mouse, Mus musculus
2012-05-01 11:42:07

Even in the wild, this rodent is associated with humans by destroying crops and stored food. The house mouse is also known as the fancy mouse, a common pet. It is also a widely used laboratory animal, important for testing in genetics, biology, and medicine. There are three recognized subspecies of the house mouse. These mice thrive in a number of locations including fields, houses, and commercial structures. An adult male house mouse can have a body length of up to 3.9 in, and tail length...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'