Quantcast
Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 9:27 EDT

Latest Population genetics Stories

2012-01-26 11:39:10

The timing and pattern of the migration of early modern humans has been a source of much debate and research. Now, a new study uses genetic analysis to look for clues about the migration of the first modern humans who moved out of Africa more than 60,000 years ago. The research, published January 26 by Cell Press in the American Journal of Human Genetics, the official journal of the American Society of Human Genetics, provides intriguing insight into the earliest stages of human migration and...

2012-01-26 11:34:11

A tiny mountainous region in southern Siberia may have been the genetic source of the earliest Native Americans, according to new research by a University of Pennsylvania-led team of anthropologists. Lying at the intersection of what is today Russia, Mongolia, China and Kazakhstan, the region known as the Altai "is a key area because it's a place that people have been coming and going for thousands and thousands of years," said Theodore Schurr, an associate professor in Penn's Department...

2012-01-19 10:18:21

While environment and family history are factors in healthy aging, genetic variants play a critical and complex role in conferring exceptional longevity, according to researchers from the Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine, Boston Medical Center, IRCCS Multimedica in Milan, Italy, and Yale University. Published in PLoS ONE, after peer review, the research findings are the corrected version of work originally published in Science in July 2010. The revised publication...

2012-01-17 13:11:17

Smut fungi can mate with other species despite great genetic differences Two-timing is nothing out of the ordinary for them: for about 100 million years, grass smut fungi have been breeding in a three-gender system. This was discovered by Dr. Ronny Kellner and Prof. Dr. Dominik Begerow of the RUB Geobotany Laboratory in cooperation with colleagues from the Heinrich Heine Universität in Düsseldorf. Using genetic analysis, they showed that the structure of the...

2012-01-10 23:20:43

The cocktail maintaining immune gene variation The great variation of a specific form of immune genes makes organ transplants so complicated. On the other hand, we need such a great variability in order to resist infectious diseases. This is why it also plays a major role in the selection of sexual partners. Up until now, the mechanisms for maintaining this standing genetic variation have remained an evolutionary puzzle. In a study of sticklebacks, researchers from the Max Planck Institute...

2011-12-30 15:00:00

Super-trainer.com unleashes their fitness marketing strategies for 2012. The news has been well received by people on the site. Houston, TX. (PRWEB) December 30, 2011 Super-trainer.com has decided to unleash their fitness marketing strategies for 2012 this week. Anybody that wants to find out more about how to skyrocket their fitness business to seven figures and beyond can check out the site and download a free a copy of these strategies. Roger Carmichaels, one of the leading editors on...

2011-12-22 15:21:02

The entire Hawaiian population of the peat moss Sphagnum palustre appears to be a clone that has been in existence for some 50,000 years researchers have discovered. The study is published in New Phytologist. Among the most long-lived of organisms, every plant of the Hawaiian population appears to have been produced by vegetative rather than sexual propagation and can be traced back to a single parent. Surprisingly, the genetic diversity of the Hawaiian clone is comparable to that...

2011-11-21 22:53:11

Max Planck researchers simulate the conditions for the safest possible release of genetically modified organisms Genetically modified animals are designed to contain the spread of pathogens. One prerequisite for the release of such organisms into the environment is that the new gene variant does not spread uncontrollably, suppressing natural populations. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön, Germany, have now established that certain...

2011-11-04 22:52:17

Quebec genealogical research provides clues to genetic consequences of human migration patterns Research published in Science today reveals that the first individuals settling on new land are more successful at passing on their genes than those who did not migrate. According to Dr. Damian Labuda at the University of Montréal and Sainte-Justine Hospital, the study suggests that population expansion creates opportunities for natural selection to act. The findings come from the...

2011-11-01 23:01:00

WASHINGTON, Nov. 2, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Evolutionary history shows that human populations likely originated in Africa, and the Genographic Project, the most extensive survey of human population genetic data to date, suggests where they went next. A study by the Project finds that modern humans migrated out of Africa via a southern route through Arabia, rather than a northern route by way of Egypt. These findings will be highlighted today at a conference at the National Geographic Society....


Latest Population genetics Reference Libraries

House Mouse, Mus musculus
2012-05-01 11:42:07

Even in the wild, this rodent is associated with humans by destroying crops and stored food. The house mouse is also known as the fancy mouse, a common pet. It is also a widely used laboratory animal, important for testing in genetics, biology, and medicine. There are three recognized subspecies of the house mouse. These mice thrive in a number of locations including fields, houses, and commercial structures. An adult male house mouse can have a body length of up to 3.9 in, and tail length...

More Articles (1 articles) »