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Latest Pork Stories

Genes May Explain Why Some People Don't Like  Meat
2012-05-03 06:12:52

If you don't like the taste of pork, the reason may be that your genes cause you to smell the meat more intensely, according to a new study. Duke University Medical Center scientists, working with colleagues in Norway, found that about 70 percent of people have two functional copies of a gene linked to an odor receptor that detects a compound in male mammals called androstenone, which is common in pork. People with one or no functional copies of the gene can tolerate the scent of...

Study Suggests Bacon Could Help Treat Arthritis
2012-04-01 14:31:00

This story was originally published on April 1st, 2012 as part of an April Fool's Day prank and promotion. It should in no way be considered as "real" news. Researchers from a prominent American university believe that they have discovered an unusual (and very tasty) way to treat the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) -- bacon. In studies conducted at Minnesota State University (MSU) in Minneapolis, lead author and biology professor Marty Lunde and colleagues found that those who...

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2012-01-26 10:30:28

A new medical study from the Detroit Medical Center is recommending a remedy to staunch nosebleeds called “nasal packing with strips of cured pork”. Yes, it is exactly what it sounds like, using salt pork in the nose, reports Marc Abrahams for The Guardian. The unusual remedy, published in the Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology by Ian Humphreys, Sonal Saraiya, Walter Belenky and James Dworkin, details the treatment of a girl suffering from a rare hereditary disorder...


Latest Pork Reference Libraries

Trichinella spiralis
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Trichinella spiralis, sometimes known as the pork worm, is a parasite within the Nematoda class. It can be found in pigs, rats, humans, and bears. This worm causes trichinosis in humans, most often from consuming undercooked pork. This species is the smallest within its class, reaching an average body length of .16 centimeters. Females are twice as large as males, displaying a sexual dimorphism. The reproductive organs of females are unique to the species in that the front end holds developed...

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2006-09-12 10:21:28

The domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) is usually given the scientific name Sus scrofa, though some authors call it S. domesticus, reserving S. scrofa for the wild boar. It was domesticated approximately 5,000 to 7,000 years ago. Pigs are found across Europe, the Middle East and extend into Asia as far as Indonesia and Japan. The distinction between wild and domestic animals is slight, and domestic pigs have become feral in many parts of the world (for example, New Zealand) and caused...

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Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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