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Latest Porpoises Stories

How Finless Porpoises Hear In the Yangtze
2013-10-21 13:40:33

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Yangtze is the longest river in Asia and it’s also one of the busiest. The amount of traffic in the Chinese waterway can pose a significant problem for animals living there, and a new study by scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in Massachusetts has found that the Yangtze’s finless porpoises may have trouble using sound to negotiate their way through the bustling waters. With an estimated 1,000 animals...

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2011-08-02 10:45:00

Researchers, led by ecologist Sandra Pompa from the National Autonomous University of Mexico, have identified 20 of the most important regions of the world's oceans and lakes that are crucial to ensuring the survival of marine mammals such as seals, whales and porpoises, reports the Guardian. Marine mammals are under constant threat from climate change, ocean acidification, hunting and other perils. Of the 20 important sites chosen, 11 include creatures that are found nowhere else on Earth,...

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2010-06-29 13:15:00

Finless porpoises may be more endangered than previously thought. A new study of finless porpoises, a rare type of toothed whale, found that there are two species, not one, and they rarely intermingle. Scientists say that finless porpoises living in the fresh waters of China's Yangtze river are genetically unique, numbering fewer than 1000.  They warn that greater efforts must be made to prevent these animals. The whales inhabit a wide range of tropical and temperate waters...

2009-08-15 13:48:09

Two recent sightings of porpoises in the Baltic Sea thrilled biologists since the marine mammals were thought extinct in the region, a Swedish researcher says. Anna Roos, a researcher at the Swedish Museum of National History, said the two porpoise sightings off Sweden's west coast occurred in a span of less than 10 days, offering encouraging news about the animals' population in the Baltic, The Local reported Saturday. To get two reports from the central Baltic in such a short space of time...

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2009-06-25 06:05:00

Mexico's swine flu crisis, coupled with its reeling economy, may end a plan to save the world's most endangered cetacean. The vaquita, the world's smallest cetacean, has seen its population dwindle to 150, and nearly 30 more die each year due to fishing nets. Mexican officials have cut funding aimed to make fishing boats vaquita-friendly. The endangered cetacean illustrates the problem with other dolphins and porpoises around the world, say campaigners. Currently, scientists,...

2009-05-27 13:56:09

Census of Marine Life historians meeting in Vancouver, Canada, say they have reconstructed images of past sea life that boggle the imagination. The researchers said they used such sources as old ship logs, literary texts and tax records to reconstruct what life in the ocean was like prior to the early 1800s. Before oil hunters harpooned whales by the hundreds, the ocean around New Zealand teemed with about 27,000 southern right whales - roughly 30 times as many as today, the scientists said....

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2009-05-08 10:02:10

The Harderwijk Dolphin Center in the Netherlands announced that a porpoise dolphin has become only the second to give birth in captivity, but the birth has left the people questioning whether its a boy or girl. "Mum Amber and her baby, Kwin, are doing fine," the center said in a statement on Thursday. Another porpoise was born in captivity in Denmark in 2007. "As we don't know much about newborn porpoises, a team of Danish minders has come to help us," the statement said. Visitors are already...

2008-10-07 06:00:28

By Dan Vergano Many animals worldwide, from toads to tigers, face extinction, a "terrifying possibility" underlined by the release Monday of a report on mammals. The report due Friday in the journal Science says that of the world's 5,487 mammal species, at least one in four land species and one in three marine species face extinction in the foreseeable future. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) predicted earlier that one in eight bird, one in three...

2008-09-14 06:00:10

By Gary Bogue Bright sunrise in the eyes Swallowtail awakes from sleep baby lizards run and leap -- Brian Murphy, Walnut Creek Dear Gary: I sail our little 24-ft. boat out of Vallejo with my brother most weekdays. A couple of weeks ago we were working our way against a fairly gruesome ebb tide and moderate winds when there among the whitecaps we saw a pair of dolphins heading outbound toward San Pablo Bay. We see all types of interesting wildlife out there but this was a first...

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2008-08-04 09:10:00

Numerous porpoise deaths in Northern California have confused researchers.  According to scientists, the month of August may see more of the dead mammals wash onto beaches. Nearly 24 dead porpoises have appeared on California beaches since May. A majority of the cases have been diagnosed as asphyxiation, trauma, pneumonia, malnutrition, and maternal separation, but eight of the deaths remain unexplained. "This is the time period every year where we do see porpoises and dolphins washed...


Latest Porpoises Reference Libraries

Dall’s Porpoise, Phocoenoides dalliz
2013-08-29 10:15:35

Dall’s porpoise (Phocoenoides dalliz) can only be found in the North Pacific, with a range that includes the Sea of Japan and the Okhotsk and Bering Seas. This range extends to southern California in the east and to the southern waters of Japan in the west. When normal weather patterns change and waters become colder, this species can be found in in Baja, California, specifically in Scammon's Lagoon, and strays can occasionally be found in the Chukchi Sea. It prefers to reside in cold...

Finless Porpoise, Neophocaena phocaenoides
2013-08-17 13:37:05

The finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) can be found in the coastal waters of Asia. Its range includes China, Indonesia, Korea, India, Japan, and Bangladesh. Its western range extends from the coast if India to the Persian Gulf and a distinct freshwater subspecies resides in the Yangtze River. It prefers to reside in shallow areas along the shore, at depths of up to 160 feet. This population is isolated within its range. A few individuals have been found as far as 99 miles off the...

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2006-08-26 19:12:04

Dall's Porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) is a species of porpoise that came to worldwide attention in the 1970s. It was disclosed for the first time to the public when salmon fishing trawls were killing thousands of Dall's Porpoise and other cetaceans each year by accidentally capturing them in their nets. The Dall's Porpoise is the only member of the Phocoenoides genus. It was named after American naturalist W.H. Dall. Physical description The unique body shape of the Dall's Porpoise...

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2006-08-26 19:06:56

The Harbor Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) is one of 6 species of porpoise, and so one of about eighty cetacean species. The Harbor Porpoise, as its name implies, stays close to coastal areas or river estuaries and as such is the most familiar porpoise to whale watchers. This porpoise often ventures up rivers and has been seen hundreds of miles from the sea. Physical description The Harbor Porpoise is a little smaller than the other porpoises. It is about 2.5 ft (75 cm) long at birth....

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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