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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 14:37 EDT

Latest Post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment Stories

2008-10-27 15:00:27

Chemo brain -- reduced cognitive abilities because of chemotherapy treatment of cancer -- can improve with computer-based training, U.S. researchers say. Lead investigator Sarah-Jane Kim said chemo brain is a well-documented phenomenon in patients with different types of cancer. The declines in processing speed and memory often diminish the confidence of patients causing them to withdraw from interactions with their family, peers or co-workers at a time when support is needed most, Kim...

2008-10-24 09:00:26

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 24 /PRNewswire/ -- Researchers at 28th annual National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN) Conference in New York City this weekend will present data to help physicians understand more about cognitive remediation training in breast cancer survivors affected by "Chemobrain". Chemobrain is a well documented phenomenon of patients with varying types of cancer. It is associated with reduced cognitive abilities; impairing memory, concentration, decision-making ability,...

2008-09-15 21:00:09

By Eric Eyre For years, cancer patients have complained about the memory loss and attention problems they experience while undergoing chemotherapy. A new animal study from West Virginia University's School of Medicine suggests there may be a way to prevent those memory- related side effects - often called "chemo-brain." WVU researchers have discovered that injections of a powerful antioxidant called N-acetyl cysteine, or NAC, could stop memory loss caused by chemotherapy drugs,...

2008-09-05 15:00:07

To: MEDICAL EDITORS Contact: Andrea Brunais, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center News Service, +1-304-293-7087, brunaisa@wvuh.com MORGANTOWN, W.Va., Sept. 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Cancer patients have complained for years about the mental fog known as chemobrain. Now in animal studies at West Virginia University, researchers have discovered that injections of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, can prevent the memory loss that breast cancer chemotherapy drugs...

2008-09-04 12:00:07

Injections of N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, can prevent the memory loss that breast cancer chemotherapy drugs sometimes induce, U.S. researchers said. Rats were given the commonly used chemotherapy drugs adriamycin and cyclophosphamide and while on the drugs, rats who were trained to prefer a light room to a dark room forgot their training. "When animals are treated with chemotherapy drugs, they lose memory," Gregory Konat said in a statement. "When we add N-acetyl cysteine during...

2008-08-13 09:00:13

New research shows that using the computer-based Posit Science Brain Fitness Program(TM) may improve mental function in cancer patients with symptoms of "chemobrain," a condition documented in up to 75% of breast cancer survivors as a result of undergoing chemotherapy. "Chemobrain" negatively affects people's quality of life by impairing concentration and the ability to make decisions. It also increases anxiety and depression and often limits their ability to participate in normal daily...

2008-05-28 03:00:08

By Galantino, Mary Lou Cannon, Nicole; Hoelker, Tiffany; Quinn, Lauren; Greene, Laurie ABSTRACT Introduction: Studies have revealed the benefits derived from yoga which includes improvements in quality of life (QOL) and decreased symptoms for women with breast cancer. Studies to date have not included specific measures of cognition with various interventions to improve QOL during survivorship. This case series tests the feasibility and use of yoga to determine perceived cognitive change and...

2006-11-30 12:01:43

New research by the University of Rochester Medical Center has found that chemotherapy drugs may be harmful to healthy brain cells. The results, which also indicate that chemotherapy may cause long-term brain damage, represent the closest that scientists have come to pinpointing the underlying cause of "chemo brain," a common side effect of cancer treatment. Cancer patients who receive chemotherapy have long complained of adverse neurological side effects ranging from memory loss,...

2006-08-16 07:05:00

By Lisa Richwine WASHINGTON -- Chemotherapy drugs may cause more serious side effects for breast cancer patients under age 64 than once thought, a U.S. study released on Tuesday said. Researchers mined insurance claims for 3,526 women who had intravenous chemotherapy for breast cancer and tallied problems serious enough to require emergency care or a hospital stay. Their review found more than 8 percent of women underwent treatment for a fever or infection compared with less than 2 percent...

2005-12-16 14:49:18

By Will Boggs, MD NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - About one in five women with breast cancer experience fatigue after treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy -- whether standard or high-dose -- according to a report in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. "Overall, these findings offer hope for breast cancer survivors, suggesting that most patients will recover their energy within one year after treatment onset and that the incidence of posttreatment fatigue is relatively low," writes Dr....