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Latest Posterior cingulate Stories

Males Differ From Females In Specific Brain Structures
2014-02-12 13:09:03

University of Cambridge Reviewing over 20 years of neuroscience research into sex differences in brain structure, a Cambridge University team has conducted the first meta-analysis of the evidence, published this week in the prestigious journal Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. The team, led by doctoral candidate Amber Ruigrok and Professors John Suckling and Simon Baron-Cohen in the Department of Psychiatry, performed a quantitative review of the brain imaging literature testing...

2014-01-15 10:34:13

Everybody feels pain differently, and brain structure may hold the clue to these differences. In a study published in the current online issue of the journal Pain, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have shown that the brain's structure is related to how intensely people perceive pain. "We found that individual differences in the amount of grey matter in certain regions of the brain are related to how sensitive different people are to pain," said Robert Coghill, Ph.D.,...

2013-08-20 15:04:24

Both Aß and tau pathology appear to be associated with default mode network integrity before clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), according to a study by Liang Wang, M.D., and colleagues at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Accumulation of Aß and tau proteins, the pathologic hallmarks of AD, starts years before clinical onset. Pathophysiological abnormalities in the preclinical phase of AD may be detected using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or neuroimaging biomarkers,...

2009-09-10 13:43:52

Those with Alzheimer's disease or obsessive-compulsive disorder may be trapped in routines and kept from adapting to new environments, U.S. researchers say. Senior author Michael Platt Duke of University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., says brain scans in monkeys indicated nerve cells in the part of the brain known as the posterior cingulate cortex fire up more strongly when the monkeys decided to explore new alternatives. The experiment began with the monkeys being given four rewards to...

2009-09-06 08:03:43

Sticking with what you know often comes at the price of learning about more favorable alternatives. Managing this trade-off is easy for many, but not for those with conditions such as Alzheimer's disease or obsessive-compulsive disorder who are trapped in simple routines. Using brain scans in monkeys, Duke University Medical Center researchers are now able to predict when monkeys will switch from exploiting a known resource to exploring their options. "Humans aren't the only animals who...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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