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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 5:20 EDT

Latest Potassium-sparing diuretics Stories

2012-11-28 13:08:16

A large study addressing the effectiveness and safety of aldosterone antagonist therapy for older heart failure patients has found notable differences between the drug's results in clinical trial vs. what occurs in actual practice, according to researchers at Duke Medicine. Those differences have been noted anecdotally by doctors, and likely contributed to the slow adoption of aldosterone antagonists in clinical practice, but they had not been confirmed in a large study examining the drugs...

2009-10-21 09:32:53

A study published in JAMA on October 21 by Nancy M. Albert and colleagues, exploring aldosterone antagonist usage among US patients hospitalized with heart failure, found that only one-third of patients meeting current US Clinical Practice Guidelines criteria were actually being treated (1). Furthermore, the observational analysis of 43,625 patients admitted with heart failure and discharged home from 241 hospitals participating in the "ËœGet With IT Guidelines', showed that...

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2009-10-21 12:30:00

Less than one-third of heart failure patients leave the hospital with drugs recommended for their condition, researchers reported Tuesday. Researchers studied 43,625 patients admitted to 241 hospitals with heart failure and discharged home. Researchers found that 12,565 patients (28.8 percent) from 201 hospitals met American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Chronic HF Guidelines for aldosterone antagonists treatment, which involves an agent that opposes the action of the...

2008-09-17 15:00:37

Patients with high blood pressure who took a diuretic and a potassium-sparing drug, reduced cardiac mortality by 40 percent, U.S. researchers said. The current U.S. hypertension treatment guidelines recommend using a thiazide diuretic -- a drug that increases the volume of urine -- alone as the initial drug therapy for high blood pressure, senior author Dr. John Oates said. The Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers analyzed data from existing clinical trials of diuretic drugs...

2005-10-04 14:42:57

INDIANAPOLIS -- Two inexpensive but widely overlooked drugs may help many patients who continue to have high blood pressure despite taking standard blood pressure medications, according to research by Indiana University School of Medicine scientists. Howard Pratt, M.D., and his colleagues studied two compounds -- amiloride and spironolactone -- in a group of African-American patients with high blood pressure. African-Americans are disproportionately affected by high blood pressure, and tend...