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Latest Precordial thump Stories

2005-12-22 13:24:12

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Having automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and coaches trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at organized sporting events for children can save lives, researchers report in The Journal of Pediatrics. In the paper, Dr. Neal J. Thomas from Penn State Children's Hospital, in Hershey, Pennsylvania and colleagues present the case of a healthy 13-year-old boy who experienced "commotio cordis" -- a sudden cardiac arrest that leads to death -- after...

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2005-05-06 07:51:50

External defibrillation is the best treatment, study finds HealthDayNews -- Conventional medical wisdom has held that pounding a heart attack victim's chest with your fist -- called a precordial thump -- might restore normal heart function, but new research appears to rule it out as an optimal solution. "The precordial thump is something which has found its way into our lore," said Dr. Harlan M. Krumholz, a professor of cardiology at Yale University School of Medicine who was not involved in...


Latest Precordial thump Reference Libraries

Precordial Thump
2012-12-31 12:53:08

The precordial thump is an application of mechanical energy through a calculated strike to the torso when in a specific fatal heart rhythm. This procedure is used in very specific circumstances by highly trained health professionals with ACLS certifications. The Procedure While in the presence of a patient that is suffering a potentially fatal heart rhythm, a medical provider can strike a calculated point on the sternum to disrupt that rhythm. The energy transferred by the provider is...

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Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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