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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 7:35 EDT
Mechanical Law Highlighted By Tiger Beetles Chase Of Its

Mechanical Law Highlighted By Tiger Beetle's Chase Of Its Prey

By Anne Ju, Cornell University If an insect drew a line as it chased its next meal, the resulting pattern would be a tangled mess. But there's a method to that mess, says Jane Wang, a Cornell University professor of mechanical engineering and...

Latest Predation Stories

Amphibians, Dinosaurs Were The New Large Predators After The Mass Extinction
2014-03-20 12:37:13

University of Zurich 252 million years ago the largest extinction event occurred at the end of the Permian age. It wiped out almost 90 percent of all life in water. So far researchers had assumed that the ecosystems gradually recovered from this catastrophe over a long stretch of eight to nine million years and that large predators at the uppermost end of the food chain were the last to reappear. A Swiss-American team of palaeontologists headed by Torsten Scheyer and Carlo Romano from the...

2014-03-10 23:23:10

A study of grasslands on six continents suggests a way to counteract the human-made overdose of fertilizer that threatens to permanently reduce their biodiversity: let grazing animals crop fast growing grasses. Grazers allow sunlight to reach ground level, encouraging other plants' growth, according to the study published online March 9, 2014 in Nature. College Park, MD (PRWEB) March 10, 2014 A comparative study of grasslands on six continents suggests there may be a way to counteract...

Eurasian Beaver Diversity In Question
2014-02-19 09:53:51

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Long-prized for their thick fur, the cuddly Eurasian beaver has been hunted by humans for thousands of years and a new genetic study from a large group of international researchers has found that predation by humans has significantly cut down the genetic diversity of these animals. “While beaver populations have been growing rapidly since the late 19th century when conservation efforts began, genetic diversity within modern beaver...

Is It Better To Be Social Or Stinky In Thwarting A Predatory Attack?
2014-02-11 05:59:04

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Skunks do it best when halting a predator in its tracks, unleashing a noxious stream of urine that can send the most lethal of hunters in the opposite direction. Other animals of the same group tend to rely on strong social bonds to thwart impending attacks. But why do some animals use noxious scents while others use strong social groups to defend against predation? To better answer this question, Theodore Stankowich, of...

2014-02-10 11:05:48

When people see a skunk, the reaction usually is “Eww,” but when they see a group of meerkats peering around, they often think “Aww.” Why some animals use noxious scents while others live in social groups to defend themselves against predators is the question that biologists Tim Caro of the University of California, Davis and Theodore Stankowich of California State University, Long Beach  and sought to answer through a comprehensive analysis of predator-prey interactions among...

Our View On How Nature Is Structured Changed By DNA Barcodes
2014-01-21 14:11:58

University of Helsinki How you seek is what you find To understand how feeding interactions are structured, researchers from Finland and Canada chose to focus on one of the simplest food webs on Earth: the moths and butterflies of Northeast Greenland, as attacked by their specialist enemies, parasitic wasps and flies developing on their prey (called host), killing it in the process. "What we found in this system was mind-boggling", explains Helena Wirta, the lead author of the study....

falcon in flight
2014-01-17 04:53:38

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Through the analysis of striking aerial video footage, a pair of researchers from Haverford College in Pennsylvania has found that falcons hunt their prey by heading them off during mid-air pursuit, according to a new report in The Journal of Experimental Biology. Initially trying to investigate how flocks react to being hunted by birds-of-prey, study author Suzanne Amador Kane said she could find very little literature on how falcons...

Video Footage Reveals Novel Insights Into Crocodilian Foraging Behaviors
2014-01-16 07:46:56

Public Library of Science Animal-borne camera reveals that alligators may attempt to capture prey most often at night, even though the calculated probability of catching prey is highest in the morning, according to a study published in PLOS ONE on January 15, 2014 by James Nifong from the University of Florida and colleagues from other institutions. Observing the behaviors of dangerous and cryptic predators like alligators is no easy task, so scientists used animal-borne cameras to...

African Tiger Fish Eats Bird
2014-01-13 11:30:38

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Stories of the African tiger fish preying on birds in mid-flight have been circulating for years and a research team from South Africa has finally captured evidence of this behavior, according to a new study in the Journal of Fish Biology. “The whole action of jumping and catching the swallow in flight happens so incredibly quickly that after we first saw it, it took all of us a while to really fully comprehend what we had just...

Charles Darwin Observations On Island Tameness In Species Confirmed
2014-01-11 05:39:37

[ Watch the Video: Island Animals Are Tamer Than On The Mainland ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Like Hawaiian vacationers, living on an island actually makes animals tamer, according to a study published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Charles Darwin, the founder of the theory of evolution, used the Galapagos Islands as his laboratory when studying animals. The Galapagos is where Darwin developed his ideas about natural selection and how organisms evolve...


Latest Predation Reference Libraries

Thomson’s Gazelle, Eudorcas thomsonii
2012-06-17 19:56:59

Thomson’s gazelle (Eudorcas thomsonii) is also known as a “tommie” and is one of the most well-known gazelle species. Named after Joseph Thomson, Thomson’s gazelle is native to Africa where it is the most commonly found gazelle. It is sometimes considered a subspecies of the red-fronted gazelle, and was previously in the genus Gazella, in the subgenus Eudorcas. Eudorcas eventually became a distinct genus, classifying some species of gazelle within their own genus. Thomson’s...

Grant’s Gazelle, Nanger granti
2012-06-15 12:08:26

Grant’s gazelle (Nanger granti) is native to Africa. Its northern range of Tanzania extends south to Ethiopia and the Sudan, and from the coast of Kenya to Lake Victoria. It prefers habitats within shrub lands and grass plains, but can also be found in regions that are more arid. In Swahili, Grant’s gazelle is called Swala Granti. It was placed within the Nanger subgenus of the genus Gazella, before Nanger became a separate genus. Grant’s gazelle holds five recognized subspecies. The...

Great Kiskadee, Pitangus sulphuratus
2009-06-16 18:41:00

The Great Kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus) is a species of passerine tyrant flycatcher found from southern Texas and Mexico south to Uruguay and central Argentina. They are also found on Trinidad. They have been introduced to Bermuda in 1957, and Tobago in 1970. The adult Great Kiskadee is 8.7 inches long and weighs 2.2 ounces. It has a black head with a white eye stripe and concealed yellow crown stripe. The upperparts are brown. The wings and tail are brown and have reddish-brown fringes....

42_5280cb9fe6f5b8c364061c7fde0d4bee
2007-08-23 02:51:24

The West Caucasian Tur (Capra caucasica), is a goat antelope found only in the western half of the Caucasus Mountain Range. They thrive in rough mountainous terrain between 2625 and 13120 feet in elevation. West Caucasian Turs are nocturnal, eating in the open at night and sheltering during the day. Females live in herds of around ten individuals, while males are solitary. The Tur stands up to 39.4 inches at the shoulder and weighs about 143 pounds. West Caucasian Turs have large but...

42_f64c530cc6c234a5e535dec0d1260745
2007-08-14 04:24:53

The Wild Goat (Capra aegagrus), is a common species of goat, with a distribution ranging from Europe and Asia Minor to central Asia and the Middle East. In the wild, these goats live in flocks of up to 500 individuals. Male wild goats are solitary and go through a period called a rut, where they are ready to mate. During the rut old males drive younger males from the maternal herds. The gestation period averages 170 days. Females usually give birth to one kid. Kids can follow the mother...

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