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Latest Predation Stories

2010-07-09 08:00:00

STONY BROOK, N.Y., July 9 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A compendium on trophic cascades and how they operate in the world's major ecosystems has been published for the first time. The term "trophic cascades" refers to the follow-on effects of top predator removal from an ecosystem, and, until now, there has not been a comprehensive synthesis of this phenomenon. Evidence accumulated in this volume indicates that trophic cascades operate in nearly all ecosystems around the world, both at sea...

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2010-07-01 09:08:18

A new analysis of the extinction of woolly mammoths and other large mammals more than 10,000 years ago suggests that they may have fallen victim to the same type of "trophic cascade" of ecosystem disruption that scientists say is being caused today by the global decline of predators such as wolves, cougars, and sharks. In each case the cascading events were originally begun by human disruption of ecosystems, a new study concludes, but around 15,000 years ago the problem was not the loss of a...

2010-06-08 07:05:00

ANN ARBOR, Mich., June 8 /PRNewswire/ -- Penrose Press is proud to announce the release of the experimental beta-test version of a new board game - Serengeti. The Serengeti Game is the first game to employ the 'predator-prey' game mechanics developed by Ray Lauzzana in 2009. This mechanism controls movement across a node network connected by directional vectors. The movement may only pass along the direction of the vectors at a cost indicated on the nodes. The game simulates the...

2010-06-04 13:38:16

Going more miles per gallon with your brain The hunting strategy of a slender fish from the Amazon is giving researchers more insight into how to balance the metabolic cost of information with the metabolic cost of moving around to get that information. A new study from Northwestern University's McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science answers the question: In behaviors in which you have to move to get information, when should the animal spend more energy on locomotion versus...

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2010-05-30 09:30:00

Scientists say that bumblebees' distinctive bright yellow and black stripes may not be what is keeping them safe from their enemies. A U.K. study has discovered that other aspects of bees' behavior may matter more than the classic bee color to keep predators away. The scientists told BBC News that a bee predator's true deterrent could be the way the bumblebees fly or perhaps the buzzing sound they make. The study was published in the Journal of Zoology. Scientists have long believed that...

2010-05-27 09:23:58

Fish alter their movements when under threat from predators to keep closer together and to help them to blend into the crowd, according to new research headed by scientists at the University of York. Researchers in the York Centre for Complex Systems Analysis (YCCSA), based in the University's Department of Biology, used a combined computer simulation and experimental study of group behavior to discover that shoaling fish co-ordinate their movements more frequently when under threat. They...

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2010-05-10 11:05:00

By using entire islands as experimental laboratories, two Dartmouth biologists have performed one of the largest manipulations of natural selection ever conducted in a wild animal population. Their results, published online on May 9 by the journal Nature, show that competition among lizards is more important than predation by birds and snakes when it comes to survival of the fittest lizard. "When Tennyson wrote that nature is 'red in tooth and claw', I think the image in his head was...

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2010-05-04 15:52:15

About half of all bird nests don't survive due to predators, particularly in fragmented forest areas, but why? University of Illinois researchers monitored both the prey and predator to find an answer. "Rat snakes accounted for a high percentage of cases of nest predation," said U of I researcher Patrick Weatherhead. "Our hypothesis was that because snakes spend so much more time on the edges of the forest, that's where bird nests should be most vulnerable. And in fact, we never found that."...

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2010-04-29 08:19:06

A weed calculator developed by an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist tells ranchers the number of additional cows they could raise if they eliminated one or two widespread exotic invasive weeds. Rangeland ecologist Matt Rinella at the ARS Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory in Miles City, Mont., created a computer model that predicts weed impacts on forage production. Data for developing the model came from 30 weed researchers working throughout the western United...

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2010-04-05 14:15:00

Lions, tigers and bears top the ecological pyramid"”the diagram of the food chain that every school child knows. They eat smaller animals, feeding on energy that flows up from the base where plants convert sunlight into carbohydrates. A new study examines complex interactions in the middle of the pyramid, where birds, bats and lizards consume insects. These predators eat enough insects to indirectly benefit plants and increase their growth, Smithsonian scientists report. "Our findings...


Latest Predation Reference Libraries

Thomson’s Gazelle, Eudorcas thomsonii
2012-06-17 19:56:59

Thomson’s gazelle (Eudorcas thomsonii) is also known as a “tommie” and is one of the most well-known gazelle species. Named after Joseph Thomson, Thomson’s gazelle is native to Africa where it is the most commonly found gazelle. It is sometimes considered a subspecies of the red-fronted gazelle, and was previously in the genus Gazella, in the subgenus Eudorcas. Eudorcas eventually became a distinct genus, classifying some species of gazelle within their own genus. Thomson’s...

Grant’s Gazelle, Nanger granti
2012-06-15 12:08:26

Grant’s gazelle (Nanger granti) is native to Africa. Its northern range of Tanzania extends south to Ethiopia and the Sudan, and from the coast of Kenya to Lake Victoria. It prefers habitats within shrub lands and grass plains, but can also be found in regions that are more arid. In Swahili, Grant’s gazelle is called Swala Granti. It was placed within the Nanger subgenus of the genus Gazella, before Nanger became a separate genus. Grant’s gazelle holds five recognized subspecies. The...

Great Kiskadee, Pitangus sulphuratus
2009-06-16 18:41:00

The Great Kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus) is a species of passerine tyrant flycatcher found from southern Texas and Mexico south to Uruguay and central Argentina. They are also found on Trinidad. They have been introduced to Bermuda in 1957, and Tobago in 1970. The adult Great Kiskadee is 8.7 inches long and weighs 2.2 ounces. It has a black head with a white eye stripe and concealed yellow crown stripe. The upperparts are brown. The wings and tail are brown and have reddish-brown fringes....

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2007-08-23 02:51:24

The West Caucasian Tur (Capra caucasica), is a goat antelope found only in the western half of the Caucasus Mountain Range. They thrive in rough mountainous terrain between 2625 and 13120 feet in elevation. West Caucasian Turs are nocturnal, eating in the open at night and sheltering during the day. Females live in herds of around ten individuals, while males are solitary. The Tur stands up to 39.4 inches at the shoulder and weighs about 143 pounds. West Caucasian Turs have large but...

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2007-08-14 04:24:53

The Wild Goat (Capra aegagrus), is a common species of goat, with a distribution ranging from Europe and Asia Minor to central Asia and the Middle East. In the wild, these goats live in flocks of up to 500 individuals. Male wild goats are solitary and go through a period called a rut, where they are ready to mate. During the rut old males drive younger males from the maternal herds. The gestation period averages 170 days. Females usually give birth to one kid. Kids can follow the mother...

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Word of the Day
ween
  • To think; to imagine; to fancy.
  • To be of opinion; have the notion; think; imagine; suppose.
The word 'ween' comes from Middle English wene, from Old English wēn, wēna ("hope, weening, expectation"), from Proto-Germanic *wēniz, *wēnōn (“hope, expectation”), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, love, want, reach, win”).
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