Quantcast
Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 12:48 EDT

Latest Predation Stories

2009-08-06 12:01:23

The fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex may not have feasted on feisty adult game, but eyed smaller, more docile prey at chow time, German researchers reported. T-rex fossils indicate the large predatory dinosaurs preyed on juvenile dinosaurs, researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat in Munich reported Thursday in a news release. Unlike their adult and well-armed relatives these young animals hardly posed any risk to the predators, Oliver Rauhut said. And their tender bones would have added...

2009-08-06 10:43:32

Two titans fighting a bloody battle "“ that often turns fatal for both of them. This is how big predatory dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus are often depicted while hunting down their supposed prey: even larger herbivorous dinosaurs. The fossils, though, do not account for that kind of hunting behavior but indicate that theropods, the large predatory dinosaurs, were frying much smaller fish. Dr. Oliver Rauhut, paleontologist at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich, and his...

2009-07-30 10:45:19

To understand how climate change may affect species survival, we need to understand how climate influences their time-keeping.New research published in the journal Biological Reviews points to time as a major factor in determining whether a species is capable of surviving in a particular habitat.In their paper "ËœTime as an ecological constraint' (Biological Reviews, August 2009), Professor Robin Dunbar of the University of Oxford, Dr Amanda Korstjens of Bournemouth University, and...

2009-07-24 14:52:23

Animals of the same species who look different from each other may have evolved that way to deter predators, British scientists said. Distinctly different looking animals within the same species -- known as exuberant polymorphisms -- can reach double figures within a single animal population, biologist Geoff Oxford of the University of York said in a release Thursday. A prime example is the Hawaiian Happy-face Spider, which varies from plain yellow to rare types with red, black or white...

2009-07-23 09:32:15

In the animal kingdom, everything is not as it seems. Individuals of the same species can look very different from each other - what biologists term 'polymorphism.' Sometimes the number of distinct visible forms - 'exuberant polymorphisms' -- in a single animal population can reach double figures. But why?Scientists at the University of York have developed computer models that may help to explain how this level of variation arises and persists. Their research is reported in the latest issue...

814dc2ff17d38c670fbe7aa828b642081
2009-07-22 15:25:00

Consider the case of the three-spine stickleback. These tiny fish that thrive in oceans and in fresh water might appear to be the same, yet ecologists are finding that they are actually a diverse collection of very specialized individuals.Understanding the ecological causes and consequences of such ecological variation is the goal of a group of scientists meeting at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, July...

2009-07-22 14:26:38

Synchronicity in nature is seen in beating hearts, the flashing of fireflies' lights, the ebb and flow of infectious disease"”and the simultaneous rise and fall of populations across vast reaches of space. While scientists have identified some factors that account for this melodic phenomenon, they have yet to sort out the relative contribution each plays in this finely tuned orchestra.Now researchers at Yale University and the University of Calgary report in the July 22 issue of...

2009-07-21 14:09:43

Introducing wolves to a test site in Scotland would establish a model for controlling the over-population of red deer, scientists in Oregon said. The plan is modeled after research at Yellowstone National Park, where the absence of large predators had allowed deer and elk to overgraze lands and damage entire ecosystems, William Ripple, a professor of forest ecosystems at Oregon State University, said in a release Monday. Wolves were last found in Scotland more than 250 years ago, and as a...

5208d10cc150b2a3bfdf3454d32744dc1
2009-07-20 13:12:24

Researchers are proposing in a new report that a major experiment be conducted to reintroduce wolves to a test site in the Scottish Highlands, to help control the populations and behavior of red deer that in the past 250 years have changed the whole nature of large ecosystems. The proposal is modeled after research done in the United States, at Yellowstone National Park and elsewhere, which has demonstrated that the absence of large predators such as wolves and cougars has allowed deer, elk...

e46952c97240f9575dd61d6534c85bb91
2009-07-17 13:17:27

Wolves have caused elk in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem to change their behavior and foraging habits so much so that herds are having fewer calves, mainly due to changes in their nutrition, according to a study published this week by Montana State University researchers. During winter, nearly all elk in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem are losing weight, said Scott Creel, ecology professor at MSU, and lead author on the study which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of...


Latest Predation Reference Libraries

Thomson’s Gazelle, Eudorcas thomsonii
2012-06-17 19:56:59

Thomson’s gazelle (Eudorcas thomsonii) is also known as a “tommie” and is one of the most well-known gazelle species. Named after Joseph Thomson, Thomson’s gazelle is native to Africa where it is the most commonly found gazelle. It is sometimes considered a subspecies of the red-fronted gazelle, and was previously in the genus Gazella, in the subgenus Eudorcas. Eudorcas eventually became a distinct genus, classifying some species of gazelle within their own genus. Thomson’s...

Grant’s Gazelle, Nanger granti
2012-06-15 12:08:26

Grant’s gazelle (Nanger granti) is native to Africa. Its northern range of Tanzania extends south to Ethiopia and the Sudan, and from the coast of Kenya to Lake Victoria. It prefers habitats within shrub lands and grass plains, but can also be found in regions that are more arid. In Swahili, Grant’s gazelle is called Swala Granti. It was placed within the Nanger subgenus of the genus Gazella, before Nanger became a separate genus. Grant’s gazelle holds five recognized subspecies. The...

Great Kiskadee, Pitangus sulphuratus
2009-06-16 18:41:00

The Great Kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus) is a species of passerine tyrant flycatcher found from southern Texas and Mexico south to Uruguay and central Argentina. They are also found on Trinidad. They have been introduced to Bermuda in 1957, and Tobago in 1970. The adult Great Kiskadee is 8.7 inches long and weighs 2.2 ounces. It has a black head with a white eye stripe and concealed yellow crown stripe. The upperparts are brown. The wings and tail are brown and have reddish-brown fringes....

42_5280cb9fe6f5b8c364061c7fde0d4bee
2007-08-23 02:51:24

The West Caucasian Tur (Capra caucasica), is a goat antelope found only in the western half of the Caucasus Mountain Range. They thrive in rough mountainous terrain between 2625 and 13120 feet in elevation. West Caucasian Turs are nocturnal, eating in the open at night and sheltering during the day. Females live in herds of around ten individuals, while males are solitary. The Tur stands up to 39.4 inches at the shoulder and weighs about 143 pounds. West Caucasian Turs have large but...

42_f64c530cc6c234a5e535dec0d1260745
2007-08-14 04:24:53

The Wild Goat (Capra aegagrus), is a common species of goat, with a distribution ranging from Europe and Asia Minor to central Asia and the Middle East. In the wild, these goats live in flocks of up to 500 individuals. Male wild goats are solitary and go through a period called a rut, where they are ready to mate. During the rut old males drive younger males from the maternal herds. The gestation period averages 170 days. Females usually give birth to one kid. Kids can follow the mother...

More Articles (7 articles) »