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Latest Predation Stories

Research Shows Coyote Predation On Deer In East Manageable
2014-05-12 03:52:05

Jeff Mulhollem, Penn State Coyotes are a major predator of white-tailed deer across the East, especially fawns born each spring, but wildlife managers nonetheless are able to stabilize and even grow deer herds, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. Coyotes -- Canis latrans -- are a relatively recent arrival to eastern North America, appearing first in the region in noticeable numbers in the 1970s. They are a significant source of deer mortality and...

2014-05-07 11:04:27

New method described in 'The Journal of Chemical Physics' simplifies studies of predator-prey interactions and other 'bistable' systems A team of U.K. researchers has developed a way to dramatically reduce the complexity of modeling "bistable" systems which involve the interaction of two evolving species where one changes faster than the other ("slow-fast systems"). Described in The Journal of Chemical Physics, the work paves the way for easier computational simulations and predictions...

2014-05-06 15:07:45

Populations of predators and their prey usually follow predictable cycles. When the number of prey increases, perhaps as their food supply becomes more abundant, predator populations also grow. When the predator population becomes too large, however, the prey population often plummets, leaving too little food for the predators, whose population also then crashes. This canonical view of predator-prey relationships was first identified by mathematical biologists Alfred Lotka and Vito...

2014-05-06 12:23:37

New Method Described in "The Journal of Chemical Physics" Simplifies Studies of Predator-Prey Interactions and other "Bistable" Systems WASHINGTON, May 6, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A team of U.K. researchers has developed a way to dramatically reduce the complexity of modeling "bistable" systems which involve the interaction of two evolving species where one changes faster than the other ("slow-fast systems"). Described in The Journal of Chemical Physics, the work paves the way...

Tiger Beetle's Chase Shows Mechanical Law
2014-04-16 13:04:33

By Anne Ju, Cornell University If an insect drew a line as it chased its next meal, the resulting pattern would be a tangled mess. But there's a method to that mess, says Jane Wang, a Cornell University professor of mechanical engineering and physics, who tries to find simple physical explanations for complex, hardwired animal behaviors. It turns out the tiger beetle, known for its speed and agility, does an optimal reorientation dance as it chases its prey at blinding speeds....

Amphibians, Dinosaurs Were The New Large Predators After The Mass Extinction
2014-03-20 12:37:13

University of Zurich 252 million years ago the largest extinction event occurred at the end of the Permian age. It wiped out almost 90 percent of all life in water. So far researchers had assumed that the ecosystems gradually recovered from this catastrophe over a long stretch of eight to nine million years and that large predators at the uppermost end of the food chain were the last to reappear. A Swiss-American team of palaeontologists headed by Torsten Scheyer and Carlo Romano from the...

2014-03-10 23:23:10

A study of grasslands on six continents suggests a way to counteract the human-made overdose of fertilizer that threatens to permanently reduce their biodiversity: let grazing animals crop fast growing grasses. Grazers allow sunlight to reach ground level, encouraging other plants' growth, according to the study published online March 9, 2014 in Nature. College Park, MD (PRWEB) March 10, 2014 A comparative study of grasslands on six continents suggests there may be a way to counteract...

Eurasian Beaver Diversity In Question
2014-02-19 09:53:51

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Long-prized for their thick fur, the cuddly Eurasian beaver has been hunted by humans for thousands of years and a new genetic study from a large group of international researchers has found that predation by humans has significantly cut down the genetic diversity of these animals. “While beaver populations have been growing rapidly since the late 19th century when conservation efforts began, genetic diversity within modern beaver...

Is It Better To Be Social Or Stinky In Thwarting A Predatory Attack?
2014-02-11 05:59:04

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Skunks do it best when halting a predator in its tracks, unleashing a noxious stream of urine that can send the most lethal of hunters in the opposite direction. Other animals of the same group tend to rely on strong social bonds to thwart impending attacks. But why do some animals use noxious scents while others use strong social groups to defend against predation? To better answer this question, Theodore Stankowich, of...

2014-02-10 11:05:48

When people see a skunk, the reaction usually is “Eww,” but when they see a group of meerkats peering around, they often think “Aww.” Why some animals use noxious scents while others live in social groups to defend themselves against predators is the question that biologists Tim Caro of the University of California, Davis and Theodore Stankowich of California State University, Long Beach  and sought to answer through a comprehensive analysis of predator-prey interactions among...


Latest Predation Reference Libraries

Thomson’s Gazelle, Eudorcas thomsonii
2012-06-17 19:56:59

Thomson’s gazelle (Eudorcas thomsonii) is also known as a “tommie” and is one of the most well-known gazelle species. Named after Joseph Thomson, Thomson’s gazelle is native to Africa where it is the most commonly found gazelle. It is sometimes considered a subspecies of the red-fronted gazelle, and was previously in the genus Gazella, in the subgenus Eudorcas. Eudorcas eventually became a distinct genus, classifying some species of gazelle within their own genus. Thomson’s...

Grant’s Gazelle, Nanger granti
2012-06-15 12:08:26

Grant’s gazelle (Nanger granti) is native to Africa. Its northern range of Tanzania extends south to Ethiopia and the Sudan, and from the coast of Kenya to Lake Victoria. It prefers habitats within shrub lands and grass plains, but can also be found in regions that are more arid. In Swahili, Grant’s gazelle is called Swala Granti. It was placed within the Nanger subgenus of the genus Gazella, before Nanger became a separate genus. Grant’s gazelle holds five recognized subspecies. The...

Great Kiskadee, Pitangus sulphuratus
2009-06-16 18:41:00

The Great Kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus) is a species of passerine tyrant flycatcher found from southern Texas and Mexico south to Uruguay and central Argentina. They are also found on Trinidad. They have been introduced to Bermuda in 1957, and Tobago in 1970. The adult Great Kiskadee is 8.7 inches long and weighs 2.2 ounces. It has a black head with a white eye stripe and concealed yellow crown stripe. The upperparts are brown. The wings and tail are brown and have reddish-brown fringes....

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2007-08-23 02:51:24

The West Caucasian Tur (Capra caucasica), is a goat antelope found only in the western half of the Caucasus Mountain Range. They thrive in rough mountainous terrain between 2625 and 13120 feet in elevation. West Caucasian Turs are nocturnal, eating in the open at night and sheltering during the day. Females live in herds of around ten individuals, while males are solitary. The Tur stands up to 39.4 inches at the shoulder and weighs about 143 pounds. West Caucasian Turs have large but...

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2007-08-14 04:24:53

The Wild Goat (Capra aegagrus), is a common species of goat, with a distribution ranging from Europe and Asia Minor to central Asia and the Middle East. In the wild, these goats live in flocks of up to 500 individuals. Male wild goats are solitary and go through a period called a rut, where they are ready to mate. During the rut old males drive younger males from the maternal herds. The gestation period averages 170 days. Females usually give birth to one kid. Kids can follow the mother...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.