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Latest Predation Stories

Changing Eating Habits Of The Hawaiian Petrel And Other Sea Birds Concern Scientists
2013-05-14 08:29:00

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Changes in the eating habits of endangered Hawaiian petrels have scientists concerned about the impact that the growth of industrialized fishing will have not only on the seabirds but upon other species of animals as well. Researchers from Michigan State University (MSU) and the Smithsonian Institution (SI) looked at both ancient and modern remains of the birds, which spent much of their lives foraging for food in the Pacific...

Picky Eating Was Critical In Saber-Tooth Tiger Extinction
2013-05-09 08:46:34

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online During the Pleistocene epoch, an astounding diversity of large-bodied mammals inhabited the so-called “mammoth steppe” — a cold and dry, yet productive, environment that extended from western Europe through northern Asia and across the Bering land bridge to the Yukon territory. Three types of large predators roamed the steppe during the Pleistocene, wolves, bears and large cats. After the end of the last ice age, only...

Early Man Ate Gazelle Brains
2013-05-06 12:11:09

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new study has once again shown that our human ancestors had no qualms about eating every part of their prey, including the brains. After uncovering fossils in Kenya, anthropologist Joseph Ferraro of Baylor University and his colleagues discovered that the earliest humans living in East Africa had a taste for multiple parts of the antelope. These early humans would even scavenge the leftovers of larger predators and finish...

Habitat Fragmentation Impacts On Santa Cruz Mountain Pumas
2013-04-19 05:26:38

[ Watch the Video: Mountain Lion Habitat Fragmentation Study ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For three years, University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) researchers have been tracking mountain lions through the Santa Cruz Mountains to document how human development affects the predators' habits. UCSC associate professor of environmental studies Chris Wilmers and colleagues at the UC Santa Cruz Puma Project reported the findings of their study in the online...

Goosefish Prey On Small Puffins Over Deep Water Of Northwest Atlantic
2013-04-11 13:51:48

Northeast Fisheries Science Center: NOAA A recent study has shown that bottom-dwelling goosefish, also known as monkfish, prey on dovekies, a small Arctic seabird and the smallest member of the puffin family. To understand how this deep-water fish finds a shallow-feeding bird in offshore waters, researchers looked at when, where, and how these animals were most likely to be in the same place at the same time. Remains of fourteen dovekie were recovered from the stomachs of 14 goosefish...

Despite Stereotypes, Male Lions Actually Do A Little Work After All
2013-03-18 19:54:47

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online As lazy as they may come off on nature channels, male lions actually are hunters and are quite successful at it, according to a new study published in Animal Behavior. Female lions are known for their hunting ability and have been observed by scientists to rely on cooperative strategies to tackle their prey. However, the latest research shows males are just as equipped to snag dinner. Authors of the paper wrote that male...

Study Finds People, Livestock And Carnivores Share Same Space
2013-03-14 08:40:53

Michigan State University In the southern Rift Valley of Kenya, the Maasai people, their livestock and a range of carnivores, including striped hyenas, spotted hyenas, lions and bat-eared foxes, are coexisting fairly happily according to a team of coupled human and natural systems researchers. “I wouldn´t call the results surprising,” said Meredith Evans Wagner, a visiting scholar from the University of Florida in the Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability...

Bite Size Determines Bite Force
2013-02-13 19:10:19

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com —  Your Universe Online Bite force allows animals to properly ingest food, making jaw mechanics very important -- especially for predators. A new study in the journal Biology Letters from biologists at Brown University has found an animal´s bite force depends upon the size of the thing the animal is eating. “Everybody measures bite force as one value,” said study co-author Nicholas Gidmark, a postdoctoral researcher at Brown....

2013-02-06 16:07:28

Same-sized fish stick together, using chemical cues to identify each other Have you ever wondered why, and how, shoals of fish are comprised of fish of the same size? According to new research by Ashley Ward, from the University of Sydney in Australia, and Suzanne Currie, from Mount Allison University in Canada, fish can use a variety of different sensory cues to locate shoal-mates, but they are able to use chemical cues to find other fish of the same size as themselves. Using these cues,...

2013-02-06 16:02:40

Perceived risk of predation increased acceptance of immigrants into group Cichlid fish are more likely to accept immigrants into their group when they are under threat from predators and need reinforcements, new research shows. The researcher suggests that there are parallels between cooperatively breeding fish's and humans' regulation of immigrants. The research was published today, 6 February 2013, in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The Princess of Lake Tanganyika...


Latest Predation Reference Libraries

Thomson’s Gazelle, Eudorcas thomsonii
2012-06-17 19:56:59

Thomson’s gazelle (Eudorcas thomsonii) is also known as a “tommie” and is one of the most well-known gazelle species. Named after Joseph Thomson, Thomson’s gazelle is native to Africa where it is the most commonly found gazelle. It is sometimes considered a subspecies of the red-fronted gazelle, and was previously in the genus Gazella, in the subgenus Eudorcas. Eudorcas eventually became a distinct genus, classifying some species of gazelle within their own genus. Thomson’s...

Grant’s Gazelle, Nanger granti
2012-06-15 12:08:26

Grant’s gazelle (Nanger granti) is native to Africa. Its northern range of Tanzania extends south to Ethiopia and the Sudan, and from the coast of Kenya to Lake Victoria. It prefers habitats within shrub lands and grass plains, but can also be found in regions that are more arid. In Swahili, Grant’s gazelle is called Swala Granti. It was placed within the Nanger subgenus of the genus Gazella, before Nanger became a separate genus. Grant’s gazelle holds five recognized subspecies. The...

Great Kiskadee, Pitangus sulphuratus
2009-06-16 18:41:00

The Great Kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus) is a species of passerine tyrant flycatcher found from southern Texas and Mexico south to Uruguay and central Argentina. They are also found on Trinidad. They have been introduced to Bermuda in 1957, and Tobago in 1970. The adult Great Kiskadee is 8.7 inches long and weighs 2.2 ounces. It has a black head with a white eye stripe and concealed yellow crown stripe. The upperparts are brown. The wings and tail are brown and have reddish-brown fringes....

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2007-08-23 02:51:24

The West Caucasian Tur (Capra caucasica), is a goat antelope found only in the western half of the Caucasus Mountain Range. They thrive in rough mountainous terrain between 2625 and 13120 feet in elevation. West Caucasian Turs are nocturnal, eating in the open at night and sheltering during the day. Females live in herds of around ten individuals, while males are solitary. The Tur stands up to 39.4 inches at the shoulder and weighs about 143 pounds. West Caucasian Turs have large but...

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2007-08-14 04:24:53

The Wild Goat (Capra aegagrus), is a common species of goat, with a distribution ranging from Europe and Asia Minor to central Asia and the Middle East. In the wild, these goats live in flocks of up to 500 individuals. Male wild goats are solitary and go through a period called a rut, where they are ready to mate. During the rut old males drive younger males from the maternal herds. The gestation period averages 170 days. Females usually give birth to one kid. Kids can follow the mother...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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