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Latest Predation Stories

Everything Within Balance: As Predators Decrease, Ecosystems Suffer
2012-04-10 12:37:03

As predators dwindle in the Northern Hemisphere, populations of their would-be prey begin to flourish. A new survey suggests such large populations are harmful to their specific ecosystems. Scientists from Oregon State University examined 42 studies from the past 50 years and found that as wolves disappear from the northern United States, Canada, and Alaska, populations of moose and deer swell. The resulting boom in moose and deer populations can be harmful to other living things in the...

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2012-03-30 13:23:23

When it comes to battling a deadly parasite epidemic, it may be better not to fight it.  A new study of freshwater zooplankton suggests less is more when it comes to evolving against a parasitic epidemic. The zooplankton, known as Daphnia dentifera, has been found to endure a yeast parasite infection known to affect more than 60% of its population. What scientists found interesting is how quickly the Daphnia population evolves, balancing infection, resistance, and reproduction....

2012-03-29 23:15:36

When battling an epidemic of a deadly parasite, less resistance can sometimes be better than more, a new study suggests. A freshwater zooplankton species known as Daphnia dentifera endures periodic epidemics of a virulent yeast parasite that can infect more than 60 percent of the Daphnia population. During these epidemics, the Daphnia population evolves quickly, balancing infection resistance and reproduction. A new study led by Georgia Institute of Technology researchers reveals that...

2012-03-09 02:36:33

The long-term impact of climate change on natural communities of wild animals could be better understood thanks to a new study The long-term impact of climate change on natural communities of wild animals could be better understood thanks to a new study. The research will help predict how migration of animals or changes to their habitats associated with climate change could impact on the evolution of relationships between predators and their prey. Scientists have shed light on how...

Sawfish Behavior Leads To Species Own Decline
2012-03-06 05:58:15

[ Watch the Video ] A team of researchers led by Barbara Wueringer of the University of Queensland, Australia have been studying the feeding habits of the freshwater-dwelling sawfish Pristis microdon. The researchers found that when the sawfish feeds, it uses electrosensors in its long snout to detect the location of the prey in the water. The sawfish swipes, several times per second, at its prey with a side to side motion with enough force to saw the fish in half. The sawfish would...

2012-02-27 10:57:52

Squirrels and raccoons will give up food to avoid ticks Here´s a riddle: What´s the difference between a tick and a lion? The answer used to be that a tick is a parasite and the lion is a predator. But now those definitions don´t seem as secure as they once did. A tick also hunts its prey, following vapor trails of carbon dioxide, and consumes host tissues (blood is considered a tissue), so at least in terms of its interactions with other creatures, it is like a lion...

2012-02-14 14:07:56

Humans move between ℠patches´ in their memory using the same strategy as bees flitting between flowers for pollen or birds searching among bushes for berries. Researchers at the University of Warwick and Indiana University have identified parallels between animals looking for food in the wild and humans searching for items within their memory — suggesting that people with the best ℠memory foraging´ strategies are better at recalling items. Scientists asked...

Redder Ladybirds Are More Deadly
2012-02-08 04:51:39

A ladybird's color indicates how well-fed and how toxic it is, according to an international team of scientists. Research led by the Universities of Exeter and Liverpool directly shows that differences between animals' warning signals reveal how poisonous individuals are to predators. Published February 7, 2012 in the journal Functional Ecology, the research shows that redder ladybirds are more poisonous than their paler peers. The study reveals that this variation is directly linked to...

Juvenile Predation Preventing Steller Sea Lion Recovery
2012-01-19 04:36:29

A new study suggests that the impact of predation on juvenile Steller sea lions in the Gulf of Alaska has been significantly underestimated, creating a “productivity pit” from which their population will have difficulty recovering without a reduction of predators. Scientists using “life history transmitters” to study Steller sea lions found evidence of age-structured predation by orcas (killer whales) and other large predators in Alaska´s Prince William Sound...


Latest Predation Reference Libraries

Thomson’s Gazelle, Eudorcas thomsonii
2012-06-17 19:56:59

Thomson’s gazelle (Eudorcas thomsonii) is also known as a “tommie” and is one of the most well-known gazelle species. Named after Joseph Thomson, Thomson’s gazelle is native to Africa where it is the most commonly found gazelle. It is sometimes considered a subspecies of the red-fronted gazelle, and was previously in the genus Gazella, in the subgenus Eudorcas. Eudorcas eventually became a distinct genus, classifying some species of gazelle within their own genus. Thomson’s...

Grant’s Gazelle, Nanger granti
2012-06-15 12:08:26

Grant’s gazelle (Nanger granti) is native to Africa. Its northern range of Tanzania extends south to Ethiopia and the Sudan, and from the coast of Kenya to Lake Victoria. It prefers habitats within shrub lands and grass plains, but can also be found in regions that are more arid. In Swahili, Grant’s gazelle is called Swala Granti. It was placed within the Nanger subgenus of the genus Gazella, before Nanger became a separate genus. Grant’s gazelle holds five recognized subspecies. The...

Great Kiskadee, Pitangus sulphuratus
2009-06-16 18:41:00

The Great Kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus) is a species of passerine tyrant flycatcher found from southern Texas and Mexico south to Uruguay and central Argentina. They are also found on Trinidad. They have been introduced to Bermuda in 1957, and Tobago in 1970. The adult Great Kiskadee is 8.7 inches long and weighs 2.2 ounces. It has a black head with a white eye stripe and concealed yellow crown stripe. The upperparts are brown. The wings and tail are brown and have reddish-brown fringes....

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2007-08-23 02:51:24

The West Caucasian Tur (Capra caucasica), is a goat antelope found only in the western half of the Caucasus Mountain Range. They thrive in rough mountainous terrain between 2625 and 13120 feet in elevation. West Caucasian Turs are nocturnal, eating in the open at night and sheltering during the day. Females live in herds of around ten individuals, while males are solitary. The Tur stands up to 39.4 inches at the shoulder and weighs about 143 pounds. West Caucasian Turs have large but...

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2007-08-14 04:24:53

The Wild Goat (Capra aegagrus), is a common species of goat, with a distribution ranging from Europe and Asia Minor to central Asia and the Middle East. In the wild, these goats live in flocks of up to 500 individuals. Male wild goats are solitary and go through a period called a rut, where they are ready to mate. During the rut old males drive younger males from the maternal herds. The gestation period averages 170 days. Females usually give birth to one kid. Kids can follow the mother...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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