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Latest Predators Stories

What Do Killer Whales Eat In The Arctic?
2012-01-30 09:36:54

Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are the top marine predator, wherever they are found, and seem to eat everything from schools of small fish to large baleen whales, over twice their own size. The increase in hunting territories available to killer whales in the Arctic due to climate change and melting sea ice could seriously affect the marine ecosystem balance. New research published in BioMed Central's re-launched open access journal Aquatic Biosystems has combined scientific observations with...

2012-01-05 08:00:00

The Bio Website EurekaMag.com publishes insights into all areas of biological science. The latest insights cover Drosophila which are small flies which have been been heavily used in research in genetics as a model organism genetics, cell-biology, biochemistry, and developmental biology, and Solar Flare which is a large energy release at the sun's surface. The insight into Killer Whale covers this toothed predatory whale belonging to the oceanic dolphin family. Mannheim, Germany (PRWEB)...

New Zealand Beach Scene Of Orca-Shark Battle
2012-01-02 09:00:01

A spectacular display of nature´s sometimes cruel cycle of life was witnessed by beachgoers at Blue Cliffs Beach in Tuatapere, New Zealand when orcas, also known as killer whales, forced a group of large sharks to swim into shallow waters or risk being eaten. One shark desperate to escape from the enormous beasts even beached itself on the sand and was filmed desperately flapping around in a bid to escape the whales, which were unable to move onto the sand, reports Rick Dewbury for...

Image 1 - Ancient Shark Attack Preserved In Fossil Whale Bone
2011-11-11 05:36:51

A fragment of whale rib found in a North Carolina strip mine is offering scientists a rare glimpse at the interactions between prehistoric sharks and whales some 3- to 4-million years ago during the Pliocene. Three tooth marks on the rib indicate the whale was once severely bitten by a strong-jawed animal. Judging by the 6 centimeter spacing between tooth marks, scientists believe the attacker was a mega toothed shark Carcharocles megalodon, or perhaps another species of large shark which...

2011-11-10 12:11:15

When both a predator and its prey are conservationally at risk, it can be difficult to find the right balance of ecosystem management to sustain and protect both. Such is the case for a particular population of orcas called southern resident killer whales and their prey, Chinook salmon, off the coast of Washington State and British Columbia, but a new detailed model of the two species may provide some guidance about what must be done to conserve both. The study, reported in the Nov. 9...

Antarctic Killer Whales Seek Spa-like Relief In The Tropics
2011-10-27 04:43:23

NOAA researchers offer a novel explanation for why a type of Antarctic killer whale performs a rapid migration to warmer tropical waters in a paper published this month in the science journal Biology Letters. One tagged Antarctic killer whale monitored by satellite traveled over 5,000 miles to visit the warm waters off southern Brazil before returning immediately to Antarctica just 42 days later. This was the first long distance migration ever reported for killer whales. "The whales are...

2011-09-21 15:00:00

Undersea Explorer, Scott Cassell Unveils Alarming New Revelations on Shark Species at Brink of Extinction during World-Record Dive Attempt in California Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) September 21, 2011 On Saturday, September 17th undersea explorer and combat diver Scott Cassell completed a 30-mile dive from Catalina Island to San Pedro, California. The astonishing feat that pushed his body to the physical edge, even causing him to black out underwater for a brief period, was all in an effort to...

2011-07-29 10:11:00

HARRISBURG, Pa., July 29, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Hunters interested in learning the age of the bear they harvested during the 2010 seasons can log onto the Pennsylvania Game Commission's website (www.pgc.state.pa.us). To access the database providing this information, click on "Hunt/Trap" in the menu bar at the top of the page, then click on "Hunting," scroll down and click on "Black Bear" in the "Big Game" listing, and then scroll down and click on "Black Bear Age Data" in the...

2011-07-25 15:58:00

CHICAGO, July 25, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Premier Basketball League is excited to welcome its newest addition to the PBL team roster with the Sauk Valley Predators. The Sauk Valley area covers all of Northwest Illinois, a great sports community that loves and supports professional basketball. Brad Grenoble, owner and general manager of the team, is looking forward to the upcoming season and being a part of the PBL. "Our goal is to bring professional sports to our community, allowing...


Latest Predators Reference Libraries

42_f04f7283597f671c1e23906fcccef593
2007-01-19 12:56:54

The bobcat (Lynx rufus, or commonly Felis rufus) is a wild cat native to North America. They are found mostly in the United States, southern Canada, and Northern Mexico. The bobcat is an adaptable animal that inhabits wooded areas as well as semi-desert, urban, and swampland environments. They live in a set home range that shifts in size with the season. They utilize several methods to mark their territorial boundaries including claw marks and deposits of urine or feces. In appearance, the...

0_7d999610ec74db875f0a738508371366
2006-08-16 20:52:41

The Orca or Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) is the largest member of the oceanic dolphin family Delphinidae. They are sometimes referred to as blackfish, a group including pilot whales, pigmy and false killer whales and melon headed whales. It is the second-most widely distributed mammal on Earth (after humans) and is found in all the world's oceans, from the frigid arctic regions to warm, tropical seas. It is also a versatile, deadly predator, eating fish, turtles, birds, seals, sharks and even...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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