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Latest Prefrontal cortex Stories

2011-03-03 12:41:48

How well our brain functions is largely based on our family's genetic makeup, according to a University of Melbourne led study. The study published in the international publication The Journal of Neuroscience provides the first evidence of a genetic effect on how "Ëœcost-efficient' our brain network wiring is, shedding light on some of the brain's make up. Lead author Dr Alex Fornito from the Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre at the University of Melbourne said the findings have...

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2011-03-03 12:14:24

Less activity found in prefrontal cortex, the 'executive center' of brain By Mark Wheeler, UCLA Tobacco smoking is the leading preventable cause of death and disease in the U.S., with more than 400,000 deaths each year attributable to smoking or its consequences. And yet teens still smoke. Indeed, smoking usually begins in the teen years, and approximately 80 percent of adult smokers became hooked by the time they were 18. Meanwhile, teens who don't take up smoking usually never do. While...

2011-02-23 17:15:49

Special issue of Neuron examines the new neuroscience of substance abuse Addiction is a brain disease that destroys lives, devastates families and tears at the very fabric of society. Effective prevention and treatment of addiction requires a clear understanding of the complex brain mechanisms that underlie addictive behaviors, and research has provided a fascinating view of how substance abuse hijacks neuronal circuits involved in reward and motivation and causes profound and persistent...

2011-02-22 22:13:04

FMRI at the University of Oregon provides a window to see differences in brain responses Mothers who are depressed respond differently to their crying babies than do non-depressed moms. In fact, their reaction, according to brain scans at the University of Oregon, is much more muted than the robust brain activity in non-depressed moms. An infant crying is normal, but how mothers respond can affect a child's development, says Jennifer C. Ablow, professor of psychology. For years, Ablow has...

2011-02-10 20:35:57

Researchers find 2 neural pathways that play role in developing phobias Why do some people fret over the most trivial matters while others remain calm in the face of calamity? Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have identified two different chinks in our brain circuitry that explain why some of us are more prone to anxiety. Their findings, published today (Thursday, Feb. 10) in the journal Neuron may pave the way for more targeted treatment of chronic fear and anxiety...

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2010-12-08 13:59:12

Zen meditation has many health benefits, including a reduced sensitivity to pain. According to new research from the Universit© de Montr©al, meditators do feel pain but they simply don't dwell on it as much. These findings, published in the month's issue of Pain, may have implications for chronic pain sufferers, such as those with arthritis, back pain or cancer. "Our previous research found that Zen meditators have lower pain sensitivity. The aim of the current study was to...

2010-11-19 08:04:19

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Children between the ages of 1 and 1 ½ who get most of their sleep at night, opposed to during the day, do better in a wide range of skills than children who don't sleep much at night. The study was conducted on 60 Canadian children aged 1, 1-1/2, and 2. The researchers looked at the effects of sleep on executive functioning. Executive functioning in children includes the ability to control impulses, remember things, and show mental...

2010-11-05 10:52:54

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Novel research from the shores of California has provided insight into mechanisms that trigger recovery after damage to the brain imperative for memory and attention.  This research highlights the role of undamaged sections of the brain that can "take over" and support the recovery function. "Brain damage" or "brain injury" (BI) is the destruction or degeneration of brain cells, often with an implication that the loss is significant in terms of functioning or...

2010-11-04 01:45:24

Brain research over the past 30 years has shown that if a part of the brain controlling movement or sensation or language is lost because of a stroke or injury, other parts of the brain can take over the lost function "“ often as well as the region that was lost. New research at the University of California, Berkeley, shows that this holds true for memory and attention as well, though "” at least for memory "” the intact brain helps out only when needed and conducts business...

2010-11-04 01:30:44

New research provides fascinating insight into mechanisms that underlie recovery after damage to a region of the brain important for memory and attention. The research, published by Cell Press in the November 4th issue of the journal Neuron, highlights the role of undamaged portions of the brain that can "take over" and support the recovery of function. Brain damage can have devastating consequences, depending on the location and severity of the injury. Damage to an area of the brain called...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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