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Latest Prefrontal cortex Stories

2011-11-03 07:09:00

NEW YORK, November 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Impulsive individuals tend to display aggressive behavior and have challenges ranging from drug and alcohol abuse, to problem gambling and difficult relationships. They are less able to adapt to different social situations. Impulsivity is also a common feature of psychiatric disorders. New research in Biological Psychiatry shows that people may react this way, in part, because they have lower levels of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid),...

2011-10-26 09:16:42

Cannabis use is associated with disturbances in concentration and memory. New research by neuroscientists at the University of Bristol, published in the Journal of Neuroscience [Oct. 25], has found that brain activity becomes uncoordinated and inaccurate during these altered states of mind, leading to neurophysiological and behavioral impairments reminiscent of those seen in schizophrenia. The collaborative study, led by Dr Matt Jones from the University's School of Physiology and...

2011-10-14 20:39:27

Computer programs used to reveal findings now available free Virtual brains modeling epilepsy and schizophrenia display less complexity among functional connections, and other differences compared to healthy brain models, researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine report. The researchers worked backward from brain rhythms — the oscillating patterns of electrical activity in the brain recorded on electroencephalograms - from both healthy and ill individuals....

2011-10-06 11:24:36

Civilized human cohabitation requires us to respect elementary social norms. We guarantee compliance with these norms with our willingness to punish norm violations — often even at our own expense. This behavior goes against our own economic self-interest and requires us to control our egoistic impulses. Innovative combination of methods In collaboration with Professor Ernst Fehr, Dr. Thomas Baumgartner and Professor Daria Knoch reveal the neuronal networks behind self-control in...

FIGURE 3_DBS EEG_v2
2011-09-25 15:19:20

Some people who receive deep brain stimulation for Parkinson´s disease behave impulsively, making quick, often bad, decisions. New research published in Nature Neuroscience explains why, and shows that under normal circumstances key parts of the brain collaborate to buy time for careful consideration of difficult decisions. Take your time. Hold your horses. Sleep on it. When people must decide between arguably equal choices, they need time to deliberate. In the case of people...

Key To Fighting Food Cravings All In Your Head
2011-09-21 10:46:53

   Researchers from Yale University and the University of Southern California, seeking new treatments to reverse the epidemic of obesity in the US, found that obese people had more difficulty resisting cravings for high-calorie foods, explaining why it might be difficult for overweight people to lose extra body mass, according to various media reports.   The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, found that thin people may be able to mentally resist...

2011-09-19 22:57:55

If the brain goes hungry, Twinkies look a lot better, a study led by researchers at Yale University and the University of Southern California has found. Brain imaging scans show that when glucose levels drop, an area of the brain known to regulate emotions and impulses loses the ability to dampen desire for high-calorie food, according to the study published online September 19 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Our prefrontal cortex is a sucker for glucose," said Rajita Sinha,...

2011-09-15 12:17:14

Research provides new insight into why some individuals may be more aggressive than others Fluctuations of serotonin levels in the brain, which often occur when someone hasn't eaten or is stressed, affects brain regions that enable people to regulate anger, new research from the University of Cambridge has shown. Although reduced serotonin levels have previously been implicated in aggression, this is the first study which has shown how this chemical helps regulate behavior in the brain...

Biological Basis For Delayed Gratification
2011-09-01 10:35:56

  Weill Cornell—led study looks at delayed gratification in adults first tested with marshmallows and cookies as pre-schoolers A landmark study in the late 1960s and early 1970s used marshmallows and cookies to assess the ability of preschool children to delay gratification. If they held off on the temptation to eat a treat, they were rewarded with more treats later. Some of the children resisted, others didn't. A newly published follow-up revisits some of the same...

2011-08-17 13:18:00

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery but how do our brains decide when and who we should copy? Researchers from The University of Nottingham have found that the key may lie in an unspoken invitation communicated through eye contact. In a study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience, a team of scientists from the University's School of Psychology show that eye contact seems to act as an invitation for mimicry, triggering mechanisms in the frontal region of the brain that...