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Latest Prefrontal cortex Stories

2011-08-17 13:18:00

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery but how do our brains decide when and who we should copy? Researchers from The University of Nottingham have found that the key may lie in an unspoken invitation communicated through eye contact. In a study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience, a team of scientists from the University's School of Psychology show that eye contact seems to act as an invitation for mimicry, triggering mechanisms in the frontal region of the brain that...

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2011-08-13 06:30:00

While both humans and chimpanzees start out life with key portions of their brains underdeveloped, the rapid growth in these cognitive and decision-making areas that occur in human children are not characteristic of young chimps, a new study has discovered. According to Sindya N. Bhanoo of the New York Times, researchers from Kyoto University in Japan discovered that both species "start out with undeveloped forebrains" but that "the human brain increases in volume much more rapidly early...

2011-08-04 13:44:43

Have you ever been approached by someone whose face you recognize but whose name you can't remember? Neuroscientists at the University of Bristol have identified the reasons behind why we are, at times, unable to link a face to a name. The research, led by Dr Clea Warburton and Dr Gareth Barker in the University's School of Physiology and Pharmacology and published in the Journal of Neuroscience, has investigated why we can recognise faces much better if we have extra clues as to where or...

2011-07-28 01:01:37

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine have been able to switch on, and then switch off, social-behavior deficits in mice that resemble those seen in people with autism and schizophrenia, thanks to a technology that allows scientists to precisely manipulate nerve activity in the brain. In synchrony with this experimentally induced socially aberrant behavior, the mice exhibited a brain-wave pattern called gamma oscillation that has been associated with autism and schizophrenia...

2011-07-28 01:00:04

Yale University researchers can't tell you where you left your car keys- but they can tell you why you can't find them. A new study published July 27 in the journal Nature shows the neural networks in the brains of the middle-aged and elderly have weaker connections and fire less robustly than in youthful ones, Intriguingly, the research suggests that this condition is reversible. "Age-related cognitive deficits can have a serious impact on our lives in the Information Age as people often...

2011-06-30 18:18:41

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that activation of nicotinic receptors within the prefrontal region of the mouse brain helps establish appropriate ranking between competing motivations If you think nicotine receptors are only important to smokers trying to kick the tobacco habit, think again. New research published in the FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org) suggests that these receptors also play an important role in social interaction and the ability to choose between competing...

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2011-06-21 08:20:00

Decisions and stress and adolescents, oh my! Stressing out about a boyfriend or girlfriend or history test is part of a typical day for a teenager. But what is making these insignificant events seem like the end of the world? With help from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Adriana Galván, a psychologist at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), has been studying the effects of stress on teenagers and adults. "Teenagers experience stress as more stressful," says...

2011-06-13 14:38:52

Study suggests that daytime sleepiness may affect eating behavior by influencing the brain's response to food Daytime sleepiness may affect inhibitory control in the brain when viewing tantalizing, high-calorie foods, suggests a research abstract that will be presented Monday, June 13, in Minneapolis, Minn., at SLEEP 2011, the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS). Results show that greater daytime sleepiness was associated with decreased...

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2011-06-04 15:55:00

Research shows morally laden scenarios get different responses from people of different ages.Moral responses change as people age says a new study from the University of Chicago.Both preschool children and adults distinguish between damage done either intentionally or accidently when assessing whether a perpetrator has done something wrong, said study author Jean Decety. But, adults are much less likely than children to think someone should be punished for damaging an object, for example,...

2011-05-26 21:03:07

A University of Toronto study shows that when formerly depressed people experience mild states of sadness, their brain's response can predict if they will become depressed again. "Part of what makes depression such a devastating disease is the high rate of relapse," says Norman Farb, a PhD psychology student and lead author of the study. "However, the fact that some patients are able to fully maintain their recovery suggests the possibility that different responses to the type of emotional...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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