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Latest Prefrontal cortex Stories

Key To Fighting Food Cravings All In Your Head
2011-09-21 10:46:53

   Researchers from Yale University and the University of Southern California, seeking new treatments to reverse the epidemic of obesity in the US, found that obese people had more difficulty resisting cravings for high-calorie foods, explaining why it might be difficult for overweight people to lose extra body mass, according to various media reports.   The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, found that thin people may be able to mentally resist...

2011-09-19 22:57:55

If the brain goes hungry, Twinkies look a lot better, a study led by researchers at Yale University and the University of Southern California has found. Brain imaging scans show that when glucose levels drop, an area of the brain known to regulate emotions and impulses loses the ability to dampen desire for high-calorie food, according to the study published online September 19 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Our prefrontal cortex is a sucker for glucose," said Rajita Sinha,...

2011-09-15 12:17:14

Research provides new insight into why some individuals may be more aggressive than others Fluctuations of serotonin levels in the brain, which often occur when someone hasn't eaten or is stressed, affects brain regions that enable people to regulate anger, new research from the University of Cambridge has shown. Although reduced serotonin levels have previously been implicated in aggression, this is the first study which has shown how this chemical helps regulate behavior in the brain...

Biological Basis For Delayed Gratification
2011-09-01 10:35:56

  Weill Cornell—led study looks at delayed gratification in adults first tested with marshmallows and cookies as pre-schoolers A landmark study in the late 1960s and early 1970s used marshmallows and cookies to assess the ability of preschool children to delay gratification. If they held off on the temptation to eat a treat, they were rewarded with more treats later. Some of the children resisted, others didn't. A newly published follow-up revisits some of the same...

2011-08-17 13:18:00

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery but how do our brains decide when and who we should copy? Researchers from The University of Nottingham have found that the key may lie in an unspoken invitation communicated through eye contact. In a study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience, a team of scientists from the University's School of Psychology show that eye contact seems to act as an invitation for mimicry, triggering mechanisms in the frontal region of the brain that...

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2011-08-13 06:30:00

While both humans and chimpanzees start out life with key portions of their brains underdeveloped, the rapid growth in these cognitive and decision-making areas that occur in human children are not characteristic of young chimps, a new study has discovered. According to Sindya N. Bhanoo of the New York Times, researchers from Kyoto University in Japan discovered that both species "start out with undeveloped forebrains" but that "the human brain increases in volume much more rapidly early...

2011-08-04 13:44:43

Have you ever been approached by someone whose face you recognize but whose name you can't remember? Neuroscientists at the University of Bristol have identified the reasons behind why we are, at times, unable to link a face to a name. The research, led by Dr Clea Warburton and Dr Gareth Barker in the University's School of Physiology and Pharmacology and published in the Journal of Neuroscience, has investigated why we can recognise faces much better if we have extra clues as to where or...

2011-07-28 01:01:37

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine have been able to switch on, and then switch off, social-behavior deficits in mice that resemble those seen in people with autism and schizophrenia, thanks to a technology that allows scientists to precisely manipulate nerve activity in the brain. In synchrony with this experimentally induced socially aberrant behavior, the mice exhibited a brain-wave pattern called gamma oscillation that has been associated with autism and schizophrenia...

2011-07-28 01:00:04

Yale University researchers can't tell you where you left your car keys- but they can tell you why you can't find them. A new study published July 27 in the journal Nature shows the neural networks in the brains of the middle-aged and elderly have weaker connections and fire less robustly than in youthful ones, Intriguingly, the research suggests that this condition is reversible. "Age-related cognitive deficits can have a serious impact on our lives in the Information Age as people often...

2011-06-30 18:18:41

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that activation of nicotinic receptors within the prefrontal region of the mouse brain helps establish appropriate ranking between competing motivations If you think nicotine receptors are only important to smokers trying to kick the tobacco habit, think again. New research published in the FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org) suggests that these receptors also play an important role in social interaction and the ability to choose between competing...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.