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Latest Prehistoric Europe Stories

2014-04-05 23:01:15

With the recent surge in corded window covering related injuries, Select Blinds is teaming up with Safekids.org and Safe Kids Day on April 5th, 2014 to increase awareness and save lives. To further help those with corded window coverings, Select Blinds is also offering free cord cleats to all consumers that want to make their homes safer for young children. Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) April 05, 2014 Select Blinds and child safety efforts have always been closely linked. The best way to keep...

Refining Dates For The Atapuerca Site Where Homo Antecessor Was Discovered
2014-02-10 09:43:28

FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology One of the issues of the Atapuerca sites that generates the most scientific debate is the dating of the strata where the fossils are found. Therefore, researchers at the Spanish National Research Centre for Human Evolution, among others, strive to settle the dates. A study published by the 'Journal of Archaeological Science' has clarified that the sediment of Gran Dolina, where the first remains of Homo antecessor were discovered in...

Scientists Find 800,000-Year-Old Human Footprints On Norfolk Beach
2014-02-07 13:51:03

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have discovered the oldest human footprints ever found in Europe on a Norfolk beach. Archaeologists, publishing a paper in the journal PLOS ONE, say they found the footprints while working at an excavation site in Happisburgh, UK along the Norfolk coast. The team said the prints consist of about five individuals who lived more than 800,000 years ago. According to the study, these prints provide direct evidence of the...

Genetic Evidence How Man Migrated To Europe
2013-08-12 14:47:31

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Humans emerged en masse from Africa thousands of years ago, but scientists still aren’t sure about the exact routes they took as they set out to populate the planet. According to a new DNA analysis from an international team of researchers, human expansion most likely occurred after the Last Glacial Maximum, between 26,500 and 19,000 years ago, and the Neolithic Era, approximately 12,000 years ago. The researchers reached their...

El Sidron cave
2013-04-03 05:14:46

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study, led by the University of Oviedo, Spain, has been able to accurately determine the age of Neanderthal remains found in the El Sidron cave of Asturias, Spain. Previous studies have provided inexact measurements for the remains. The new study found that a pre-treatment to reduce modern carbon contamination has lowered the margin of error from 40,000 to 3,200 years. One of the westernmost Neanderthal sites on the Iberian...

Stone Ships Give Clues To Bronze Age At Baltic Sea
2013-03-21 19:23:23

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Towns that revolved around their shipping industry in the Bronze Age immortalized their backbone to survival by creating stone ship monuments along the Baltic Sea region. A new study suggests Bronze Age stone monuments in the form of ships were built by maritime groups as a symbol of their practices at sea. Archaeologists have long thought these stone ships served as graves for one or several individuals, and have even been...

Farming Arrived In Stone Age Europe Via Near East Migrants
2013-02-12 12:25:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The seeds for the rise of Western civilization were planted when humans living in Europe began to adopt farming, a more efficient and reliable way to supply food, as opposed to hunting and gathering. A recent report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), found farming technology was brought to the region by people who moved there from the Near East. "One of the big questions in European archaeology...

Tree Rings Of Prehistoric Wooden Wells Preserved Human History
2012-12-20 11:10:16

Public Library of Science First farming communities in Europe were skilled carpenters, made water wells out of wood Prehistoric farming communities in Europe constructed water wells out of oak timbers, revealing that these first farmers were skilled carpenters long before metal was discovered or used for tools. The research published December 19 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Willy Tegel and colleagues from the University of Freiburg, Germany, contradicts the common belief that...

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2010-10-12 12:45:00

New evidence released Monday suggests cave dwellers who lived in northern Spain around 500,000 years ago actually took care of their elderly. The University of Madrid paleontologists discovered the partial male skeleton from a European species ancestral to the Neanderthals who suffered from a stoop and possibly needed a stick to remain upright. "This individual would be probably impaired for hunting, among other activities. His survival during a considerable period with these...

2009-09-03 23:30:00

Analysis of ancient DNA from skeletons suggests that Europe's first farmers were not the descendants of the people who settled the area after the retreat of the ice sheets. Instead, the early farmers probably migrated into major areas of central and eastern Europe about 7,500 years ago, bringing domesticated plants and animals with them, says Barbara Bramanti from Mainz University in Germany and colleagues. The researchers analyzed DNA from hunter-gatherer and early farmer burials, and...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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