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Latest Prehistoric mammals Stories

Running For Life: How Speed Restricts Evolutionary Change Of The Vertebral Column
2014-07-15 03:30:37

Naturalis Biodiversity Center One of the riddles of mammal evolution explained: the strong conservation of the number of trunk vertebrae. Researchers of the Naturalis Biodiversity Center and the University of Utah show that this conservation is probably due to the essential role of speed and agility in survival of fast running mammals. They measured variation in vertebrae of 774 individual mammal skeletons of both fast and slow running species. The researchers found that a combination of...

Large-Scale Study Reconstructs Earliest Mammalian Ancestor
2013-02-07 14:05:44

[Watch Video: Reconstructing Common Ancestor Of Placental Mammals] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A team from Carnegie Museum of Natural History have completed the largest-ever study of mammalian ancestors, helping to construct what the common ancestor of all mammals may have looked like. The six-year research project looked at the evolution of placental mammals, which are the largest branch of the mammalian family tree with over 5,100 living species....

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2011-08-25 11:05:58

  A well-preserved fossil discovered in China provides new evidence that the split between placental mammals and marsupials may have occurred 35 million years earlier than previously believed, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. The scientists, led by Carnegie Museum of Natural History paleontologist Zhe-Xi Luo, said the discovery fills an important gap in the fossil record, and helps to calibrate modern, DNA-based methods of dating evolution. The...

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2009-10-09 06:40:00

The fossil of a previously unknown chipmunk-sized mammal was discovered by researchers in north eastern China, who believe it could lead to a better understanding of how human hearing evolved. The team of paleontologists found the 123-million-year-old creature, which is just five inches long, in fossil-rich Liaoning Province, close to where China borders North Korea. "What is most surprising, and thus scientifically interesting, is the animal's inner ear," said Zhe-Xi Luo, a curator at the...

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2006-12-13 13:05:00

NEW YORK - A new fossil discovery from China shows that a tiny squirrel-like creature glided through the air during the age of dinosaurs, more than 75 million years earlier than scientists had documented that ability in a mammal. The creature might have even beaten birds into the air. Like today's flying squirrels, it stretched a furry membrane between its limbs to provide an airfoil for gliding after it jumped from a tree. But it's not related to anything living today. Scientists don't know...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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