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Latest Prenatal stress Stories

Maternal Stress May Have A Temporary Effect On Fetuses
2014-06-03 03:10:42

Durham University Fetuses are more likely to show left-handed movements in the womb when their mothers are stressed, according to new research. Researchers at Durham and Lancaster universities say their findings are an indicator that maternal stress could have a temporary effect on unborn babies, adding that their research highlights the importance of reducing stress during pregnancy. However, the researchers emphasized that their study was not evidence that maternal stress led to...

2013-11-12 09:22:11

Penn Medicine studies presented at Neuroscience 2013 point to 2 potential ways mothers pass stress onto child Pregnant women may transmit the damaging effects of stress to their unborn child by way of the bacteria in their vagina and through the placenta, suggest new findings from two animal studies presented by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania at Neuroscience 2013, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. Stresses felt by mothers during pregnancy have been shown...

2012-10-17 22:28:03

Scientists at the Universities of Liverpool, Manchester, and Kings College, London, have found that mothers who stroke their baby's body in the first few weeks after birth may change the effects that stress during pregnancy can have on an infant's early-life development. Researchers world-wide have been studying whether stress in pregnancy can lead to emotional and behavioral problems in children for many years. Attention is now moving towards how parents might alter these effects after...

2012-05-03 11:48:30

Pregnant women may have added incentive to bulk up on broccoli and eggs now that a Cornell University study has found increased maternal intake of the nutrient choline could decrease their children's chances of developing hypertension and diabetes later in life. In a study led by Marie Caudill, associate professor of nutritional sciences, and graduate student Xinyin Jiang, a group of third-trimester pregnant women consumed 930 milligrams of choline, more than double the recommended 450...

2011-08-17 22:07:03

Study identifies changes in brain that might contribute to individual differences in behavior Sons of male mice exposed to prenatal stress are more sensitive to stress as adults, according to a study in the August 17 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. These findings suggest experiences in the womb can lead to individual differences in stress response that may be passed across generations. Tracy Bale, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania, and colleagues previously found that male mice...

2011-08-01 19:52:08

Research points to critical role of maternal health and well-being during pregnancy Young adults whose mothers experienced psychological trauma during their pregnancies show signs of accelerated aging, a UC Irvine-led study found. The researchers discovered that this prenatal exposure to stress affected the development of chromosome regions that control cell aging processes. The study results, which appear online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, point to the...

2010-03-15 14:01:00

NEW YORK, March 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Expectant mothers and their loved ones can now more closely share in the pregnancy experience thanks to the new Prenatal Yoga for Partners DVD created by HAPPYBABY, the nation's leading premium organic baby and toddler food company. One of the only products of its kind, this wellness DVD features HAPPYBABY CEO and founder Shazi Visram and her husband, Joe Kulak, a certified yoga instructor and physical therapist with more than a decade of experience,...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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