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Latest Prevention of dementia Stories

2009-01-16 12:45:52

Britons perceive greater societal stigma from diagnosis than do AmericansA new study has found that in spite of their universal health care system which facilitates access to free dementia care, older adults in the United Kingdom are less willing to undergo dementia screening than their counterparts in the U.S. because the Britons perceive greater societal stigma from diagnosis of the disease than do Americans.Researchers surveyed 125 older adults in Indianapolis and 120 older adults in Kent,...

2008-11-04 15:00:05

People with Alzheimer's disease who also have diabetes or high blood pressure may die sooner than those who don't, U.S. researchers said. A study involved 323 people who had no memory problems when first tested but later developed dementia. Memory tests and physical exams were then given every 18 months. The study, published in the journal Neurology, found that after an Alzheimer's diagnosis was made, people with diabetes were twice as likely to die sooner than those without diabetes who...

2008-07-29 21:00:16

By Marilynn Marchione CHICAGO - A milder type of mental decline that often precedes Alzheimer's disease is alarmingly more common than has been believed, and in men more than women, doctors reported Monday. Nearly a million older Americans slide from normal memory into mild impairment each year, researchers estimate, based on a Mayo Clinic study of Minnesota residents. That's on top of the half million Americans who develop full- blown Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia - a problem...

2008-07-28 18:00:17

By John von Radowitz Commonly used blood pressure drugs could prove to be powerful new weapons against Alzheimer's, new research has suggested. Scientists found that the drugs, known as angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), both prevented the disease occurring and slowed its progression. The effect was "striking", according to the US researchers who reported their findings at an Alzheimer's conference in Chicago. A database at the US Department of Health Systems Veterans Affairs...

2008-07-19 00:00:03

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS LONDON - Some doctors have long suspected that if the plaque that builds up in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease could be removed, they could be saved. But a new vaccine that did just that suggests the theory is wrong. British researchers gave 64 patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease an experimental vaccine designed to eliminate plaque from their brains. Some patients were followed for up to six years. Autopsies on seven patients who died of...

2008-07-18 18:00:40

Exercise helps prevent many health problems but Canadian review of studies found there isn't enough evidence to show it helps treat dementia. Review lead author Dorothy Forbes of the University of Western Ontario said researchers have shown that exercise can improve cognition and mental health in older adults and some studies suggest that it could delay dementia from three to six years or reduce the risk that patients will develop cognitive problems. It is less clear if physical...

2008-07-15 06:00:07

By Mark Vierthaler, Journal-World, Lawrence, Kan. Jul. 15--Alzheimer's patients who were in better physical shape than their peers were shown to have a larger brain, according to a study by a Kansas University Medical Center physician/researcher. A study group of 121 people over age 60, 57 of whom were in the early stages of Alzheimer's, were given a one-time physical fitness test. Those who were less physically fit had four times more brain shrinkage when compared with those who were in...

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2008-07-08 10:39:27

Elderly people who are treated for high blood pressure may be effectively cutting their risk of developing dementia, according to a new report published on Monday. Previous research has shown that blood pressure treatment reduced the risk of strokes and heart problems in people over 80 years old. "There may be an additional benefit in terms of prevention of dementia," said Dr. Ruth Peters of Imperial College London, whose study appears in the journal Lancet Neurology. Dr. Peters and...

2007-12-19 19:22:22

ST. PAUL, Minn. "“ People age 65 and older who regularly walk and get other forms of moderate exercise appear to significantly lower their risk of developing vascular dementia, the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the December 19, 2007, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The four-year study involved 749 men and women in Italy who were over age 65 and did...

2007-12-04 06:00:39

LAS VEGAS, Dec. 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Lou Ruvo Brain Institute today announced Dr. Ronald C. Petersen, Director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, was awarded the Lou Ruvo Brain Institute's Leon Thal Prize for Excellence in Dementia Research. Dr. Petersen became the first recipient of the award. This prestigious award acknowledges a senior investigator in the field of dementia research who best emulates Leon Thal's characteristics as physician, teacher, scientist, mentor,...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.