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Latest Primate Stories

Image 1 - Pigeons Have Numerical Abilities Just Like Primates
2011-12-23 09:21:47

Researchers at University of Otago in New Zealand have found that pigeons are able to learn abstract rules about numbers, an ability that until now had been demonstrated only in primates. Scientists had trained rhesus monkeys in the 1990s to look at groups of items on a screen and rank them from lowest number of items to highest. It has already been known that pigeons know how to count, just like many other animals, including bees and other species of birds. In a study, published in the...

I Wanna Talk Like You (oo)
2011-12-17 04:20:18

The role of social structure in animal communication is hotly debated. Non-human primates seem to be born with a range of calls and sounds which is dependent upon their species. But overlying this there seems to be some flexibility - you can tell where a gibbon lives by its accent. New research published in Biomed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology used Campbell's monkeys to look in detail at the nature versus nurture question and showed that non-human primate 'language',...

2011-12-14 14:54:57

People and giant snakes not only target each other for food — they also compete for the same prey, according to a study co-authored by a Cornell University researcher. More than a quarter of the men in a modern Filipino hunter-gatherer group have been attacked by giant pythons – yet those same hunter-gatherers often target the pythons as their next meal. The study also finds that both the hunters and the pythons routinely eat local deer, wild pigs and monkeys. "Hunter-gatherers...

Starving Orangutans Could Help Understanding Of Obesity And Eating Disorders
2011-12-14 05:39:58

Rutgers University evolutionary anthropologist leads 5-year study Rutgers Evolutionary Anthropologist Erin Vogel thinks new research published Dec. 12 in Biology Letters, a Journal of the Royal Society, examining how endangered Indonesian orangutans — considered a close relative to humans -- survive during times of extreme food scarcity might help scientists better understand eating disorders and obesity in humans. "There is such a large obesity epidemic today and yet we don't...

Law Enforcement Key To Great Ape Survival
2011-12-10 04:14:49

A recent study shows that, over the last two decades, areas with the greatest decrease in African great ape populations are those with no active protection from poaching by forest guards. Recent studies show that the populations of African great apes are rapidly decreasing. Many areas where apes occur are scarcely managed and weakly protected. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have carried out an international collaborative project...

Savanna Chimps Exhibit Human-like Sharing Behavior
2011-12-02 04:59:09

Sharing food has widely been considered by scholars as a defining characteristic of human behavior. But a new study by Iowa State University anthropology professor Jill Pruetz now reports that chimpanzees from her Fongoli research site in Senegal also frequently share food and hunting tools with other chimps. Co-authored by ISU anthropology graduate student Stacy Lindshield, their study is posted online in Primates and will be published in a future issue of the journal. The researchers...

Ravens Use Gestures To Signal Potential Partners
2011-11-30 06:37:06

Ravens use their beaks and wings to point and hold up objects in order to attract attention, much like humans use our hands to make gestures, according to a new study by German and Austrian experts. The study is the first time researchers have observed such gestures in the wild by animals other than primates, suggesting that ravens (Corvus corax) may be far more intelligent than previously believed. Simone Pika from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology and Thomas Bugnyar from the...

Monkey Moms Are Key To Sons' Reproductive Success
2011-11-08 04:16:44

If you are a male human, nothing puts a damper on romantic success like having your mother in tow. If you are a male northern muriqui monkey, however, mom's presence may be your best bet to find and successfully mate with just the right girl at the right time. In a study of wild primates, reported this week (Nov. 7, 2011) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison anthropologist Karen B. Strier describes a monkey society where equality and...

2011-10-17 15:09:14

The South China Center for Innovative Pharmaceuticals, Sun Yat-Sen University, and BGI, the world's largest genomic organization, announced that they were among the research organizations from China, US and UK comprising an international research group that completed the genome sequence and comparison of two non-human primate animal models - Chinese rhesus macaque and cynomolgus. The study is published today online in the journal Nature Biotechnology. This study marks an important...

2011-08-16 15:20:06

From hot pink to traditional French and Lady Gaga's sophisticated designs, manicured nails have become the grammar of fashion. But they are not just pretty "” when nails appeared on all fingers and toes in modern primates about 55 million years ago, they led to the development of critical functions, including finger pads that allow for sensitive touch and the ability to grasp, whether it's a nail polish brush or remover to prepare for the next trend. In a new study co-authored by...


Latest Primate Reference Libraries

Brown Spider Monkey, Ateles hybridus
2014-04-28 09:58:59

Brown Spider Monkeys have long and thin limbs with their forelimbs being longer than their hind limbs. They also have a distinctive 75 centimeter long flexible and thin prehensile tail which at times acts like a fifth limb. The tip is hairless with ridged skin for better grip. All of these features of their body make it possible for them to climb trees and high elevations, hang and swing from one tree to another without having to lower themselves to the ground frequently. Their hands are...

Northern Muriqui, Brachyteles hypoxanthus
2014-04-17 13:48:56

The Northern Muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) is an endangered muriqui, meaning woolly spider monkey, species that is endemic to Brazil. It is rare among primates in that it shows egaliterian social relationships. It can be found in the Atlantic forest region of the Brazilian states of Espirito Santo, Minas Gerais, Bahia, and Rio de Janeiro. Muriquis are the biggest species of New World monkeys. The northern muriqui can grow up to 4.3 feet tall. This species feeds mostly on leaves and twigs,...

Sunda Slow Loris, Nycticebus coucang
2014-04-16 11:22:42

The Sunda slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), also known as the greater slow loris, is a primate that can be found in Singapore, western areas of Malaysia, southern areas of Thailand, and Indonesia. This species prefers to reside in tropical rainforests but can be found in other habitats. It was first discovered in 1770 by Dutchman Arnout Vosmaer, who described it as a sloth, and was later classified with all other known lorises as a single species. Today, the Sunda slow loris is one of nine...

Gray Langurs
2014-04-10 16:46:11

Gray langurs, also known as Hanuman langurs, are members of the Semnopithecus genus, which contains seven species of Old World monkeys. Members of this genus can be found in a large range on the Indian subcontinent, preferring to reside in forested areas or semi-wooded areas at low or moderate elevations, although some species can be found as high as 13,000 feet above sea level. Until 2001, Semnopithecus entellus was the only species classified within this genus. When it was separated into...

Yellow-Tailed Woolly Monkey, Oreonax flavicauda
2014-04-10 14:40:56

The Yellow-Tailed Woolly Monkey (Oreonax flavicauda) is a New World monkey that is native to Peru. It is a rare primate species that is found only in the Peruvian Andes, in the departments of Amaxonas and San Martin, along with the bordering areas of La Libertad, Huanuco, and Loreto. This woolly monkey was, at first, under the Lagothrix genera with other woolly monkeys, but because of debatable primary sources, they have been placed under the Oreonax genera. This genus has been suggested to...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
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