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40ceb9c15a68c2e7df485a61a7aefb6e
2011-05-17 07:39:35

Physical anthropologist Chris Kirk has announced the discovery of a previously unknown species of fossil primate, Mescalerolemur horneri, in the Devil's Graveyard badlands of West Texas. Mescalerolemur lived during the Eocene Epoch about 43 million years ago, and would have most closely resembled a small present-day lemur. Mescalerolemur is a member of an extinct primate group "“ the adapiforms "“ that were found throughout the Northern Hemisphere in the Eocene. However, just like...

ae0f3dc35c3e6fd5785cdaf99ecbb862
2011-04-06 08:25:33

By Carol Clark, Emory University It's been a puzzle why our two closest living primate relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, have widely different social traits, despite belonging to the same genus. Now, a comparative analysis of their brains shows neuroanatomical differences that may be responsible for these behaviors, from the aggression more typical of chimpanzees to the social tolerance of bonobos. "What's remarkable is that the data appears to match what we know about the human brain and...

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2011-03-30 07:25:00

A team of researchers studying Old World monkeys have found that the primates have better numerical skills than previously believed, BBC News reports. They found, using a basic numeracy test, that long-tail macaques were able to determine which of two plates had more raisins. However, in strange fashion, the macaques only excelled in the basic test if they were not allowed to eat the raisins used in the experiment. The results of the experiments show that the animals have the ability to...

2011-03-17 17:41:07

The tendency to perceive others as "us versus them" isn't exclusively human but appears to be shared by our primate cousins, a new study led by Yale researchers has found. In a series of ingenious experiments, Yale researchers led by psychologist Laurie Santos showed that monkeys treat individuals from outside their groups with the same suspicion and dislike as their human cousins tend to treat outsiders, suggesting that the roots of human intergroup conflict may be evolutionarily quite...

2011-03-10 23:20:09

One of the most complex human mysteries involves how and why we became an outlier species in terms of biological success. Research findings published in the March 11 edition of the journal Science by an international team of noted anthropologists, including several from Arizona State University, who study hunter-gatherer societies, are informing the issue by suggesting that human ancestral social structure may be the root of cumulative culture and cooperation and, ultimately, human...

564f9cc4c6f5f13c4f97d734d738bfcf1
2011-03-10 14:19:54

Chimpanzees, gorillas and other primate, including humans, share similar aging rates and mortality gender gap A new study says chimps, gorillas and other primates grow old gracefully much like humans. The findings come from the first-ever multi-species comparison of primate aging patterns reported in the March 11 issue of Science. It was long thought that humans, who have relatively long life spans, age more slowly than other animals. But new research funded by the National Science...

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2011-01-03 12:00:00

Paleontologists have found two new sabertooth species that use to roam in an ancient lakeside habitat in Africa, along with humankind's oldest known ancestor. A team unearthed the remains of a seven million-year-old human-like creature known as "Toumai" at the central African site. Its discoverers say that Toumai is the oldest hominid species known to exist. The Toumai's skull was found in the Djurab desert by a team led by Michael Brunet of the University of Poitiers, France....

2db350369703d3fe61d303d042818f3d
2010-12-02 07:48:55

What sets mankind's closest relatives "” monkeys, apes, and other primates "” apart from other animals? According to a new study, one answer is that primates are less susceptible to the seasonal ups and downs "” particularly rainfall"” that take their toll on other animals. The findings may also help explain the evolutionary success of early humans, scientists say. The study appeared online in the November 30 issue of American Naturalist. "Wild animals deal with a...

2010-11-06 02:40:58

Evolutionary divergence of humans from chimpanzees likely occurred some 8 million years ago rather than the 5 million year estimate widely accepted by scientists, a new statistical model suggests. The revised estimate of when the human species parted ways from its closest primate relatives should enable scientists to better interpret the history of human evolution, said Robert D. Martin, curator of biological anthropology at the Field Museum, and a co-author of the new study appearing in the...

b26d36526be8725df9ef9dfcf2653b131
2010-10-27 15:17:04

New paper appearing in Nature asks questions and frames future research Today in the journal Nature, a new discovery described by a team of international scientists, including Carnegie Museum of Natural History paleontologist Christopher Beard, suggests that anthropoids"”the primate group that includes humans, apes, and monkeys"”"colonized" Africa, rather than originally evolving in Africa as has been widely accepted. According to this paper, what is exceptional about these new...


Latest Primate Reference Libraries

Brown Spider Monkey, Ateles hybridus
2014-04-28 09:58:59

Brown Spider Monkeys have long and thin limbs with their forelimbs being longer than their hind limbs. They also have a distinctive 75 centimeter long flexible and thin prehensile tail which at times acts like a fifth limb. The tip is hairless with ridged skin for better grip. All of these features of their body make it possible for them to climb trees and high elevations, hang and swing from one tree to another without having to lower themselves to the ground frequently. Their hands are...

Northern Muriqui, Brachyteles hypoxanthus
2014-04-17 13:48:56

The Northern Muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) is an endangered muriqui, meaning woolly spider monkey, species that is endemic to Brazil. It is rare among primates in that it shows egaliterian social relationships. It can be found in the Atlantic forest region of the Brazilian states of Espirito Santo, Minas Gerais, Bahia, and Rio de Janeiro. Muriquis are the biggest species of New World monkeys. The northern muriqui can grow up to 4.3 feet tall. This species feeds mostly on leaves and twigs,...

Sunda Slow Loris, Nycticebus coucang
2014-04-16 11:22:42

The Sunda slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), also known as the greater slow loris, is a primate that can be found in Singapore, western areas of Malaysia, southern areas of Thailand, and Indonesia. This species prefers to reside in tropical rainforests but can be found in other habitats. It was first discovered in 1770 by Dutchman Arnout Vosmaer, who described it as a sloth, and was later classified with all other known lorises as a single species. Today, the Sunda slow loris is one of nine...

Gray Langurs
2014-04-10 16:46:11

Gray langurs, also known as Hanuman langurs, are members of the Semnopithecus genus, which contains seven species of Old World monkeys. Members of this genus can be found in a large range on the Indian subcontinent, preferring to reside in forested areas or semi-wooded areas at low or moderate elevations, although some species can be found as high as 13,000 feet above sea level. Until 2001, Semnopithecus entellus was the only species classified within this genus. When it was separated into...

Yellow-Tailed Woolly Monkey, Oreonax flavicauda
2014-04-10 14:40:56

The Yellow-Tailed Woolly Monkey (Oreonax flavicauda) is a New World monkey that is native to Peru. It is a rare primate species that is found only in the Peruvian Andes, in the departments of Amaxonas and San Martin, along with the bordering areas of La Libertad, Huanuco, and Loreto. This woolly monkey was, at first, under the Lagothrix genera with other woolly monkeys, but because of debatable primary sources, they have been placed under the Oreonax genera. This genus has been suggested to...

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Word of the Day
bellycheer
  • Good cheer; viands.
  • To revel; to feast.
The word 'bellycheer' may come from 'belle cheer', "good cheer".
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