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Latest Primate Stories

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2009-08-24 12:34:11

Experts say endangered species are being threatened by Internet advertisements asking people adopt "playful primates" from Cameroon, AFP reported. It is illegal and forbidden to deal primates in the central African country. But one environmental activist in the front line said that over the past three years the Internet has led to a flourishing trade in endangered species. The Last Great Ape Organization (Laga-Cameroon) is a small non-governmental organization that works in conjunction with...

2009-08-19 08:44:07

U.S. scientists say the ability of vitamin D to regulate anti-bactericidal proteins has been conserved in primates for nearly 60 million years of evolution. Oregon State University researchers said that part of the immune system is shared only by primates, including humans -- but no other known animal species. The fact that the vitamin-D mediated immune response has been retained through millions of years of evolutionary selection -- and is still found in species ranging from squirrel monkeys...

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2009-08-18 12:05:00

 A prehistoric water-filled cave in the Dominican Republic has become a "treasure trove" with the announcement by Indiana University archaeologists of the discovery of stone tools, a small primate skull in remarkable condition, and the claws, jawbone and other bones of several species of sloths.The discoveries extend by thousands of years the scope of investigations led Charles Beeker, director of Academic Diving and Underwater Science Programs at IU Bloomington's School of Health,...

2009-07-30 10:45:19

To understand how climate change may affect species survival, we need to understand how climate influences their time-keeping.New research published in the journal Biological Reviews points to time as a major factor in determining whether a species is capable of surviving in a particular habitat.In their paper "ËœTime as an ecological constraint' (Biological Reviews, August 2009), Professor Robin Dunbar of the University of Oxford, Dr Amanda Korstjens of Bournemouth University, and...

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2009-07-29 05:40:00

Scientists studied how Sumatran orangutans are able to swing from branches that appear too weak to handle their weight. They believe their findings will help their fight for survival.  A research team from Birmingham, U.K. says the animals use their hands and feet to move through the canopy in a unique way compared to other primates. The research is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The population of Sumatran orangutans is on the decline, and now at risk...

2009-07-16 09:50:00

The use of tools by hominins - the primate group which includes humans (Homo) and chimpanzees and bonobos (Pan) - has been extensively researched by archaeologists and primatologists, both of who manifest the relevance of tool-use in understanding technology and the origins of human behavior. However, recent research has highlighted the need to include other species such as gorillas and orangutans, as well as other extinct primate groups prior to hominins, in order to situate, for the first...

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2009-07-15 12:50:00

A University of Calgary archaeologist who is one of the few researchers in the world studying the material culture of human beings' closest living relatives "“ the great apes "“ is joining his colleagues in creating a new discipline devoted to the history of tool use in all primate species in order to better understand human evolution.Julio Mercader, holder of the Canada Research Chair in Tropical Archaeology in the U of C's Department of Archaeology, is the only Canadian author...

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2009-07-14 11:35:00

'Passive' mate guarding influenced evolution of lemur sizeWhen it comes to investigating mysteries, Sherlock Holmes has nothing on Rice University biologist Amy Dunham. In a newly published paper, Dunham offers a new theory for one of primatology's long-standing mysteries: Why are male and female lemurs the same size? In most primate species, males have evolved to be much larger than females. Size is an advantage for males that guard females to keep other males from mating with them, and...

2009-06-25 12:15:00

Sharpe et al. Study Finds Dose High Enough to Cause Adverse Effect in Rats and Mice Has No Effect in Male Marmosets ARLINGTON, Va., June 25 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American Chemistry Council (ACC) today announced that strong new evidence has emerged that phthalates may not affect the reproductive development of humans, as opposed to the effects seen in some rats and mice. A study by McKinnell et al. shows no reproductive effects from phthalates in marmosets. In research conducted in...

2009-06-25 11:50:00

Researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have demonstrated for the first time rhesus monkeys and humans share a specific perceptual mechanism, configural perception, for discriminating among the numerous faces they encounter daily. The study, reported in the June 25 online issue of Current Biology, provides insight into the evolution of the critical human social skill of facial recognition, which enables us to form relationships and interact appropriately...


Latest Primate Reference Libraries

Northern Muriqui, Brachyteles hypoxanthus
2014-04-17 13:48:56

The Northern Muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) is an endangered muriqui, meaning woolly spider monkey, species that is endemic to Brazil. It is rare among primates in that it shows egaliterian social relationships. It can be found in the Atlantic forest region of the Brazilian states of Espirito Santo, Minas Gerais, Bahia, and Rio de Janeiro. Muriquis are the biggest species of New World monkeys. The northern muriqui can grow up to 4.3 feet tall. This species feeds mostly on leaves and twigs,...

Sunda Slow Loris, Nycticebus coucang
2014-04-16 11:22:42

The Sunda slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), also known as the greater slow loris, is a primate that can be found in Singapore, western areas of Malaysia, southern areas of Thailand, and Indonesia. This species prefers to reside in tropical rainforests but can be found in other habitats. It was first discovered in 1770 by Dutchman Arnout Vosmaer, who described it as a sloth, and was later classified with all other known lorises as a single species. Today, the Sunda slow loris is one of nine...

Gray Langurs
2014-04-10 16:46:11

Gray langurs, also known as Hanuman langurs, are members of the Semnopithecus genus, which contains seven species of Old World monkeys. Members of this genus can be found in a large range on the Indian subcontinent, preferring to reside in forested areas or semi-wooded areas at low or moderate elevations, although some species can be found as high as 13,000 feet above sea level. Until 2001, Semnopithecus entellus was the only species classified within this genus. When it was separated into...

Yellow-Tailed Woolly Monkey, Oreonax flavicauda
2014-04-10 14:40:56

The Yellow-Tailed Woolly Monkey (Oreonax flavicauda) is a New World monkey that is native to Peru. It is a rare primate species that is found only in the Peruvian Andes, in the departments of Amaxonas and San Martin, along with the bordering areas of La Libertad, Huanuco, and Loreto. This woolly monkey was, at first, under the Lagothrix genera with other woolly monkeys, but because of debatable primary sources, they have been placed under the Oreonax genera. This genus has been suggested to...

Primatology
2013-10-02 13:00:50

Primatology is the study of primates that focuses on their behaviors and possible evolution. Those who practice this science, known as primatologists, focus on primates in the wild and in laboratory settings. There are many different sub-divisions of primatology that differ based on methodology and theory, but the two major branches are Western primatology and Japanese primatology. There share basic principles, but differ culturally and in many other regards. Western primatology originated...

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