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Latest Primate Stories

2008-06-26 09:03:03

Greencastle Resources Ltd. ("Greencastle," or the "Company,")(TSX VENTURE: VGN) is pleased to report that development continues at the Primate section in west central Saskatchewan, where Greencastle holds a gross overriding royalty after making the initial heavy oil discovery in 2003. Recently, the project operator completed a new well which has now commenced production. The Primate section now has 11 producing heavy oil wells and two gas wells. Greencastle's revenue, derived from the...

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2008-06-10 15:35:00

Researchers have discovered groups of long-tailed macaque monkeys in Indonesia that have learned how to fish.According to researchers from The Nature Conservancy and the Great Ape Trust, groups of long-tailed macaques were observed four times over the past eight years scooping up small fish with their hands and eating them along rivers in East Kalimantan and North Sumatra provinces.The macaques are known to eat fruit and forage for crabs and insects, but fishing from rivers is a documented...

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2008-05-19 00:25:00

Scientists at Emory University have genetically engineered monkeys to have Huntington's disease in hopes of gaining a better understanding of the fatal, hereditary ailment to develop possible new treatments.The researchers, from Emory University's Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta, said the monkeys are the first primates to be genetically modified. Describing their work, they said one of two surviving rhesus macaque monkeys engineered to have the defective gene that causes...

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2008-05-17 01:10:00

Smaller primates expend no more energy climbing than they do walking, Duke University researchers have found. This surprising discovery may explain the evolutionary edge that encouraged the tiny ancestors of modern humans, apes and monkeys to climb into the trees about 65 million years ago and stay there. The researchers compared the energy consumed by five different primate species while negotiating vertical and horizontal treadmills. Their work appears in the May 16 issue of the journal...

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2008-05-15 09:44:00

Studies with non-human primates have made major contributions to our understanding of the brain and will continue to be an important, if small, part of neuroscience research, according to a recent review published in the British medical journal, The Lancet.Authors John P. Capitanio, professor of psychology at UC Davis and associate director of the California National Primate Research Center, and Professor Marina E. Emborg at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Wisconsin National...

2008-04-19 05:18:30

Brains are good for more than acing exams. Turns out, nerdy noggins also help primates like us live longer, anthropologists say. Scientists have long pondered the reason for humans' and other primates' relatively hefty heads. Elephants boast the biggest brains  by volume of all land animals, but relative to body size, humans hold the brain-size record. "There's got to be a benefit to this big brain, because big brains are really expensive to grow and maintain, energetically...

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2008-04-16 15:50:00

Some primates have evolved big brains because their extra brainpower helps them live and reproduce longer, an advantage that outweighs the demands of extra years of growth and development they spend reaching adulthood, anthropologists from Duke University and the University of Zurich have concluded in a new study.The four investigators compared key benchmarks in the development of 28 different primate species, ranging from humans living free of modern trappings in South American jungles to...

2008-04-03 11:08:04

When painted, they can add a girly sparkle to hands, and for some people they can substitute as a guitar pick or even a backscratcher. These savvy services, though, are not the reason we humans sport the keratin-rich coverings atop our fingertips. "We have fingernails because we're primates," said John Hawks, a biological anthropologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Fingernails are one of the features that distinguish primates, including humans, from other mammals....

2008-03-20 23:55:00

News of politicians' extramarital affairs seems to be in no short supply lately, but if humans were cut from exactly the same cloth as other mammals, a faithful spouse would be an unusual phenomenon. Only 3 percent to 5 percent of the roughly 5,000 species of mammals (including humans) are known to form lifelong, monogamous bonds, with the loyal superstars including beavers, wolves and some bats. Social monogamy is a term referring to creatures that pair up to mate and raise offspring but...

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2008-03-19 18:10:00

Analysis of the first hand bones belonging to an ancient lemur has revealed a mysterious joint structure that has scientists puzzled.Pierre Lemelin, an assistant professor of anatomy at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, and a team of fellow American researchers have analyzed the first hand bones ever found of Hadropithecus stenognathus, a lemur that lived 2,000 years ago. The bones were discovered in 2003 in a cave in southeastern Madagascar, an island nation off the coast of...


Latest Primate Reference Libraries

Brown Spider Monkey, Ateles hybridus
2014-04-28 09:58:59

Brown Spider Monkeys have long and thin limbs with their forelimbs being longer than their hind limbs. They also have a distinctive 75 centimeter long flexible and thin prehensile tail which at times acts like a fifth limb. The tip is hairless with ridged skin for better grip. All of these features of their body make it possible for them to climb trees and high elevations, hang and swing from one tree to another without having to lower themselves to the ground frequently. Their hands are...

Northern Muriqui, Brachyteles hypoxanthus
2014-04-17 13:48:56

The Northern Muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) is an endangered muriqui, meaning woolly spider monkey, species that is endemic to Brazil. It is rare among primates in that it shows egaliterian social relationships. It can be found in the Atlantic forest region of the Brazilian states of Espirito Santo, Minas Gerais, Bahia, and Rio de Janeiro. Muriquis are the biggest species of New World monkeys. The northern muriqui can grow up to 4.3 feet tall. This species feeds mostly on leaves and twigs,...

Sunda Slow Loris, Nycticebus coucang
2014-04-16 11:22:42

The Sunda slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), also known as the greater slow loris, is a primate that can be found in Singapore, western areas of Malaysia, southern areas of Thailand, and Indonesia. This species prefers to reside in tropical rainforests but can be found in other habitats. It was first discovered in 1770 by Dutchman Arnout Vosmaer, who described it as a sloth, and was later classified with all other known lorises as a single species. Today, the Sunda slow loris is one of nine...

Gray Langurs
2014-04-10 16:46:11

Gray langurs, also known as Hanuman langurs, are members of the Semnopithecus genus, which contains seven species of Old World monkeys. Members of this genus can be found in a large range on the Indian subcontinent, preferring to reside in forested areas or semi-wooded areas at low or moderate elevations, although some species can be found as high as 13,000 feet above sea level. Until 2001, Semnopithecus entellus was the only species classified within this genus. When it was separated into...

Yellow-Tailed Woolly Monkey, Oreonax flavicauda
2014-04-10 14:40:56

The Yellow-Tailed Woolly Monkey (Oreonax flavicauda) is a New World monkey that is native to Peru. It is a rare primate species that is found only in the Peruvian Andes, in the departments of Amaxonas and San Martin, along with the bordering areas of La Libertad, Huanuco, and Loreto. This woolly monkey was, at first, under the Lagothrix genera with other woolly monkeys, but because of debatable primary sources, they have been placed under the Oreonax genera. This genus has been suggested to...

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Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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