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Latest Primate Stories

Estrogenic Plants Alters Hormones In Monkeys
2012-11-20 20:59:37

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new study says eating certain vegetables may influence hormone levels and behaviors like aggression and sexual activity in monkeys. The research from the University of California, Berkeley is the first to observe the connection between plant-based estrogenic compounds and behavior in wild primates. They found that the more leaves of Millettia dura the male red colobus monkeys ate, the higher their levels of estradiol and...

Evidence Found To Support Nocturnal Bottleneck Theory
2012-11-01 09:33:36

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Most species of diurnal mammals have retained the imprint of nocturnal life in their eye structures since the age of dinosaurs. According to a new study from The University of Texas at Austin and Midwestern University, anthropoid primates - including humans, monkeys and apes - are the only groups that deviate from this pattern. This study is the first to provide a large-scale body of evidence for the "nocturnal bottleneck theory,"...

Sneaky Sex The Norm For Some Monkeys
2012-10-31 06:00:00

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Ever tried to have sex in a house full of people, especially people you feel in competition with? It's not that easy, and the feeling of being watched is off-putting for most of us. It would be worse if those people could actually see you, and harass you during the act, right? Apparently, monkeys feel the same way. A new study by Anne Overduin-de Vries and her team from the Biomedical Primate Research Center reveals that monkeys shy...

Monkeys Deconstruct The World Through Triangular Grids
2012-10-29 09:16:42

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at Emory University have shown that some primates visually deconstruct the world through triangular grids. According to their report in the journal Nature, the scientists have identified grid cells in the brains of rhesus monkeys that fire in triangular patterns as their eyes scan a scene. Uncovering this brain activity in primates could have larger ramifications as the grid cells are connected to how we view and recall...

Endangered Monkey Tied To Saving Brazil Forests
2012-10-20 09:38:52

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports — Your Universe Online A conservation campaign that helped save an endangered species of monkey in Brazil is now turning its attention towards preserving the forests it calls home. According to Associated Press (AP) reporter Juliana Barbassa, the efforts that helped save the squirrel-sized golden lion tamarins was "one of the world's most inspired species restoration efforts" that "became a passion for everyone from international animal aid groups...

Evolution Is A Matter Of Brawn Vs Brain
2012-10-16 06:07:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Brain size relevant to body size has been the most common measurement of intelligence in animals, but it may not be as dependent on evolutionary selection of the brain as was previously thought. This is according to a new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. A generation of scientists has used brain size relative to body size to predict an animal's intelligence. An example is the human...

Madagascar Primates In Peril
2012-10-15 14:20:12

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Madagascar´s isolation has led to the island developing some of the most unique plants and animals – so much so that many ecologists refer to it as the “eighth continent.” Unfortunately, a report titled “Primates in Peril” from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has singled-out Madagascar as home to six of the twenty-five most severely threatened primate species living on the...

2012-09-04 10:45:34

Scorekeeping of past favors isn't, however, a factor While exchanging favors with others, humans tend to think in terms of tit-for-tat, an assumption easily extended to other animals. As a result, reciprocity is often viewed as a cognitive feat requiring memory, perhaps even calculation. But what if the process is simpler, not only in other animals but in humans as well? Researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have determined monkeys may gain the...

Similarities Between Operatic Soprano Singers And Helium-Huffing Monkeys Detailed
2012-08-23 13:53:06

John Neumann for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If you are not a fan of opera music, you may have already assumed the similarities of a classic music form and the shrieks of helium-huffing monkeys. Researchers in Japan however, have released a study detailing similarities between such primates, gibbons in particular, and professional soprano singers. A gibbon´s song is acoustically unique among primates, with a melody which can be heard over two miles away. Wild gibbons use...


Latest Primate Reference Libraries

Brown Spider Monkey, Ateles hybridus
2014-04-28 09:58:59

Brown Spider Monkeys have long and thin limbs with their forelimbs being longer than their hind limbs. They also have a distinctive 75 centimeter long flexible and thin prehensile tail which at times acts like a fifth limb. The tip is hairless with ridged skin for better grip. All of these features of their body make it possible for them to climb trees and high elevations, hang and swing from one tree to another without having to lower themselves to the ground frequently. Their hands are...

Northern Muriqui, Brachyteles hypoxanthus
2014-04-17 13:48:56

The Northern Muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) is an endangered muriqui, meaning woolly spider monkey, species that is endemic to Brazil. It is rare among primates in that it shows egaliterian social relationships. It can be found in the Atlantic forest region of the Brazilian states of Espirito Santo, Minas Gerais, Bahia, and Rio de Janeiro. Muriquis are the biggest species of New World monkeys. The northern muriqui can grow up to 4.3 feet tall. This species feeds mostly on leaves and twigs,...

Sunda Slow Loris, Nycticebus coucang
2014-04-16 11:22:42

The Sunda slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), also known as the greater slow loris, is a primate that can be found in Singapore, western areas of Malaysia, southern areas of Thailand, and Indonesia. This species prefers to reside in tropical rainforests but can be found in other habitats. It was first discovered in 1770 by Dutchman Arnout Vosmaer, who described it as a sloth, and was later classified with all other known lorises as a single species. Today, the Sunda slow loris is one of nine...

Gray Langurs
2014-04-10 16:46:11

Gray langurs, also known as Hanuman langurs, are members of the Semnopithecus genus, which contains seven species of Old World monkeys. Members of this genus can be found in a large range on the Indian subcontinent, preferring to reside in forested areas or semi-wooded areas at low or moderate elevations, although some species can be found as high as 13,000 feet above sea level. Until 2001, Semnopithecus entellus was the only species classified within this genus. When it was separated into...

Yellow-Tailed Woolly Monkey, Oreonax flavicauda
2014-04-10 14:40:56

The Yellow-Tailed Woolly Monkey (Oreonax flavicauda) is a New World monkey that is native to Peru. It is a rare primate species that is found only in the Peruvian Andes, in the departments of Amaxonas and San Martin, along with the bordering areas of La Libertad, Huanuco, and Loreto. This woolly monkey was, at first, under the Lagothrix genera with other woolly monkeys, but because of debatable primary sources, they have been placed under the Oreonax genera. This genus has been suggested to...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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