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Latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Stories

2012-03-05 23:23:20

Scientists show that comprehensive ocean planning can maximize profit and minimize conflict The ocean is becoming an increasingly crowded place. New users, such as the wind industry, compete with existing users and interests for space and resources. With the federal mandate for comprehensive ocean planning made explicit in the National Ocean Policy, the need for the transparent evaluation of potential tradeoffs is now greater than ever. A study published in the March 5 Proceedings of...

Upper Class More Likely To Exhibit Unethical Behavior
2012-02-29 04:18:13

The upper class has a higher propensity for unethical behavior, being more likely to believe — as did Gordon Gekko in the movie “Wall Street” — that “greed is good,” according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. In seven separate studies conducted on the UC Berkeley campus, in the San Francisco Bay Area and nationwide, UC Berkeley researchers consistently found that upper-class participants were more likely to lie and cheat when...

2012-02-28 10:45:48

Antisense oligonucleotides — short segments of genetic material designed to target specific areas of a gene or chromosome — that activated an enzyme to "chew up" toxic RNA (ribonucleic acid) could point the way to a treatment for a degenerative muscle disease called myotonic dystrophy, said researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in a report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "This is a proof-of-principle therapy...

2012-02-24 18:00:05

Cells that die naturally generate a lot of internal debris that can trigger the immune system to attack the body, leading to diseases such as lupus. Now Georgia Health Sciences University researchers report that an enzyme known to help keep a woman's immune system from attacking a fetus also helps block development of these autoimmune diseases that target healthy tissues, such as DNA or joints. The findings point toward new treatment strategies for autoimmune diseases, which are on the...

Offshore Wind Farms Vulnerable To Hurricanes
2012-02-15 14:34:29

In a world of green energy aficionados, offshore wind farms have become all the rage. Yet with the U.S. poised to invest untold billions in the environmentally friendly power source, a recent study has caused many to question the financial liabilities associated with what now seems a very risky investment. According to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, yearly offshore hurricanes would likely destroy roughly half of the proposed wind turbines...

2012-02-15 10:30:13

The most deadly form of "ovarian" cancer arises in the fallopian tubes — not the ovaries — of knockout mice that lack two genes associated with the disease, said researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "While many questions remain about the steps in the pathogenesis of this deadly disease in women, our study opens a new door to understanding the molecular origins and...

2012-02-07 14:53:33

An endocrine hormone used in clinical trials as an anti-obesity and anti-diabetes drug causes significant and rapid bone loss in mice, raising concerns about its safe use, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have shown. The hormone, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), promotes bone loss by enhancing the activity of a protein that stimulates fat cells but inhibits bone cells, researchers report in a study available online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences....

2012-02-07 14:51:17

In a study published last week in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, a team led by Dr. Vincent Poitout of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM)* has made an important step forward in understanding how insulin secretion is regulated in the body. This discovery has important implications for drugs currently in development to treat Type 2 diabetes, a disease which is diagnosed every 10 seconds somewhere...

2012-02-06 22:35:48

Utah study implicates arms race between genes and germs University of Utah biologists found new evidence why mice, people and other vertebrate animals carry thousands of varieties of genes to make immune-system proteins named MHCs — even though some of those genes make us susceptible to infections and to autoimmune diseases. "Major histocompatibility complex" (MHC) proteins are found on the surface of most cells in vertebrate animals. They distinguish self from foreign, and...

2012-02-02 22:41:13

Scientists at the University Medical Center in Mainz prove multiple DNA repair defect in monocytes Scientists working with Professor Bernd Kaina of the Institute of Toxicology at the Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have demonstrated for the first time that certain cells circulating in human blood — so-called monocytes — are extremely sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS). They were also able to clarify the reason for this: ROS are aggressive forms of...


Latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Reference Libraries

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
2012-05-29 11:19:42

The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1914 as the official journal of the US National Academy of Sciences. The first managing editor of the journal was mathematician Edwin Bidwell Wilson. As of May 2012, the editor-in-chief is Inder M. Verma. PNAS is published weekly in print, and daily online in PNAS Early Edition. The first issue of PNAS was published in 1915, and the journal...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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