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Latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Stories

Offshore Wind Farms Vulnerable To Hurricanes
2012-02-15 14:34:29

In a world of green energy aficionados, offshore wind farms have become all the rage. Yet with the U.S. poised to invest untold billions in the environmentally friendly power source, a recent study has caused many to question the financial liabilities associated with what now seems a very risky investment. According to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, yearly offshore hurricanes would likely destroy roughly half of the proposed wind turbines...

2012-02-15 10:30:13

The most deadly form of "ovarian" cancer arises in the fallopian tubes — not the ovaries — of knockout mice that lack two genes associated with the disease, said researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "While many questions remain about the steps in the pathogenesis of this deadly disease in women, our study opens a new door to understanding the molecular origins and...

2012-02-07 14:53:33

An endocrine hormone used in clinical trials as an anti-obesity and anti-diabetes drug causes significant and rapid bone loss in mice, raising concerns about its safe use, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have shown. The hormone, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), promotes bone loss by enhancing the activity of a protein that stimulates fat cells but inhibits bone cells, researchers report in a study available online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences....

2012-02-07 14:51:17

In a study published last week in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, a team led by Dr. Vincent Poitout of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM)* has made an important step forward in understanding how insulin secretion is regulated in the body. This discovery has important implications for drugs currently in development to treat Type 2 diabetes, a disease which is diagnosed every 10 seconds somewhere...

2012-02-06 22:35:48

Utah study implicates arms race between genes and germs University of Utah biologists found new evidence why mice, people and other vertebrate animals carry thousands of varieties of genes to make immune-system proteins named MHCs — even though some of those genes make us susceptible to infections and to autoimmune diseases. "Major histocompatibility complex" (MHC) proteins are found on the surface of most cells in vertebrate animals. They distinguish self from foreign, and...

2012-02-02 22:41:13

Scientists at the University Medical Center in Mainz prove multiple DNA repair defect in monocytes Scientists working with Professor Bernd Kaina of the Institute of Toxicology at the Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz have demonstrated for the first time that certain cells circulating in human blood — so-called monocytes — are extremely sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS). They were also able to clarify the reason for this: ROS are aggressive forms of...

2012-01-31 09:45:38

A study of the cells that respond to crises in the blood system has yielded a few surprises, redrawing the ℠map´ of how blood cells are made in the body. The finding, by researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, could have wide-ranging implications for understanding blood diseases such as myeloproliferative disorders (that cause excess production of blood cells) as well as used to develop new ways of controlling how blood and clotting cells are produced. The...

2012-01-26 13:54:33

Japan used seawater to cool nuclear fuel at the stricken Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant after the tsunami in March 2011 -- and that was probably the best action to take at the time, says Professor Alexandra Navrotsky of the University of California, Davis. But Navrotsky and others have since discovered a new way in which seawater can corrode nuclear fuel, forming uranium compounds that could potentially travel long distances, either in solution or as very small particles. The research...

2012-01-23 22:29:14

Defective proteins that are not disposed of by the body can cause diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) of Biochemistry recently succeeded in revealing the structure of the cellular protein degradation machinery (26S proteasome) by combining different methods of structural biology. The results of collaboration with colleagues from the University of California, San Francisco and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH...

Image 1 - Ancient Popcorn Found In Peru
2012-01-19 09:04:19

A new study suggests that people living along the coast of Peru snacked on popcorn 1,000 years earlier than previously believed, based on corncobs recently found at an ancient site. In the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, study coauthor Dolores Piperno, curator of New World archaeology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, and an emeritus staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, reports finding corncobs at the site dating...


Latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Reference Libraries

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
2012-05-29 11:19:42

The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1914 as the official journal of the US National Academy of Sciences. The first managing editor of the journal was mathematician Edwin Bidwell Wilson. As of May 2012, the editor-in-chief is Inder M. Verma. PNAS is published weekly in print, and daily online in PNAS Early Edition. The first issue of PNAS was published in 1915, and the journal...

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