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Latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Stories

2013-10-01 10:12:53

By detailing a process required for repairing DNA breakage, scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have gained a better understanding of how cells deal with the barrage of damage that can contribute to cancer and other diseases. The insights, reported online the week of Sept. 30, 2013, in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, build on earlier work by the research team and identify new prospects for developing cancer therapies. The researchers have focused on a...

2013-10-01 10:09:54

When faced with uncertain situations, people are less able to make decisions as they age, according to a new study by researchers at Yale School of Medicine. Published in the Sept. 30 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study also found that older people are more risk-averse than their midlife counterparts when choosing between possible gains, but more risk-seeking when choosing between losses. Scientists have long-observed that cognitive function improves throughout...

2013-09-03 10:39:16

The amount of raw materials needed to sustain the economies of developed countries is significantly greater than presently used indicators suggest, a new Australian study has revealed. Using a new modelling tool and more comprehensive indicators, researchers were able to map the flow of raw materials across the world economy with unprecedented accuracy to determine the true "material footprint" of 186 countries over a two-decade period (from 1990 to 2008). The study, involving...

2013-08-06 09:08:57

The onset of the Great Recession and, more generally, deteriorating economic conditions lead mothers to engage in harsh parenting, such as hitting or shouting at children, a team of researchers has found. But the effect is only found in mothers who carry a gene variation that makes them more likely to react to their environment. The study, conducted by scholars at New York University, Columbia University, Princeton University, and Pennsylvania State University's College of Medicine,...

2013-08-06 09:06:55

UC Davis researchers have identified how and where in the genome a cancer chemotherapy agent acts on and 'un-silences' the epigenetically silenced gene that causes Angelman syndrome, a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability, seizures, motor impairments, and laughing and smiling. The agent, Topotecan, is a topoisomerase inhibitor, part of a class of drugs that in earlier research has been found to un-silence the Angelman gene, suggesting that it...

2013-07-19 15:37:35

UC San Francisco researchers have found a way to knock down cancers caused by a tumor-driving protein called “myc,” paving the way for patients with myc-driven cancers to enroll in clinical trials for experimental treatments. Myc acts somewhat like a master switch within cells to foster uncontrolled growth. Until now, it has been impossible to target with drugs. The discovery of an unexpected biochemical link within tumor cells should lead to clinical...

2013-07-10 19:30:57

A collaboration of biologists, engineers, and material scientists at Brown University has found that jagged edges of graphene can easily pierce cell membranes, allowing graphene to enter the cell and disrupt normal function. Understanding the mechanical forces of nanotoxicity should help engineers design safer materials at the nanoscale. Researchers from Brown University have shown how tiny graphene microsheets — ultra-thin materials with a number of commercial...

2013-07-02 00:04:17

Findings a step toward engineering advanced medical treatments Knowing virtually everything about how the body’s cells make transitions from one state to another – for instance, precisely how particular cells develop into multi-cellular organisms – would be a major jump forward in understanding the basics of what drives biological processes. Such a leap could open doors to far-reaching advances in medical science, bioengineering and...

2013-06-11 11:16:32

New findings provide vital step towards exploring pain medications that may lower risks of prescription drug abuse and side effects of painkillers For patients managing cancer and other chronic health issues, painkillers such as morphine and Vicodin are often essential for pain relief. The body's natural tendency to develop tolerance to these medications, however, often requires patients to take higher doses — increasing risks of harmful side effects and dependency. Now, new...

2013-06-11 11:12:09

Females play a larger role in determining paternity than previously thought, say biologists in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences. Their findings are the subject of a new paper titled "Female mediation of competitive fertilization success in Drosophila melanogaster," published this month by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Stefan Lüpold, a research assistant professor in the college's Department of Biology and...


Latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Reference Libraries

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
2012-05-29 11:19:42

The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1914 as the official journal of the US National Academy of Sciences. The first managing editor of the journal was mathematician Edwin Bidwell Wilson. As of May 2012, the editor-in-chief is Inder M. Verma. PNAS is published weekly in print, and daily online in PNAS Early Edition. The first issue of PNAS was published in 1915, and the journal...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.