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Latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Stories

2012-05-22 02:50:34

New research from the University of Cincinnati (UC) points to the naturally produced protein apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) as a potential target for a new diabetes therapeutic. Patrick Tso, PhD, professor in the UC Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, has published research on the ability of apoA-IV to reduce blood sugar levels and enhance insulin secretion. The results appear the week of May 21, 2012, in the online early edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of...

2012-05-22 02:46:55

Brown researchers have discovered mechanical properties of stem cells can foretell what they will become To become better healers, tissue engineering need a timely and reliable way to obtain enough raw materials: cells that either already are or can become the tissue they need to build. In a new study, Brown University biomedical engineers show that the stiffness, viscosity, and other mechanical properties of adult stem cells derived from fat, such as liposuction waste, can predict whether...

Steam from a Processing Plant
2012-05-15 21:52:45

A new study led by Carrie Schloss, an analyst in environmental and forest sciences at the University of Washington, finds that nine percent of the Western Hemisphere's mammals, and nearly forty percent in particular regions, will fall victim to the changing climate. Some mammals are merely too slow to escape climate change in their natural habitats and are unable to move into different areas. The study seeks to understand if the mammals can actually adapt to these conditions by moving or not....

2012-05-08 10:53:13

The study, published yesterday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), looked at how genes on sex-linked chromosomes are passed down generations and linked to fertility, using the specific example of the W chromosome in female chickens. The results confirm that although these chromosomes have shrunk over millions of years, and have lost many of their original genes, those that remain are extremely important in predicting fertility and are, therefore, unlikely...

2012-05-07 20:30:41

Such deletions could confer survival advantage on tumors, a challenge to '2-hit theory' of tumor suppressor action Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have amassed strong experimental evidence implying that commonly occurring large chromosomal deletions that are seen in many cancer types contain areas harboring multiple functionally linked genes whose loss, they posit, confers a survival advantage on growing tumors. Looking...

2012-05-04 09:22:33

A team led by Johns Hopkins engineers has discovered some previously unknown properties of a common memory material, paving the way for development of new forms of memory drives, movie discs and computer systems that retain data more quickly, last longer and allow far more capacity than current data storage media. The work was reported April 16 in the online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The research focused on an inexpensive phase-change memory alloy...

2012-05-02 21:26:48

Current nanomedicine research has focused on the delivery of established and novel therapeutics. But a UNC team is taking a different approach. They developed nanoparticle carriers to successfully deliver therapeutic doses of a cancer drug that had previously failed clinical development due to pharmacologic challenges. They report their proof of principle findings in the April 30, 2012 early online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Wortmannin is a drug that was...

Novel Method To Identify Sources Of Global Sea Level Rise
2012-04-24 11:08:34

As the Earth's climate warms, a melting ice sheet produces a distinct and highly non-uniform pattern of sea-level change, with sea level falling close to the melting ice sheet and rising progressively farther away. The pattern for each ice sheet is unique and is known as its sea level fingerprint. Now, a group of geophysicists from the University of Toronto, Harvard and Rutgers Universities have found a way to identify the sea level fingerprint left by a particular ice sheet, and possibly...

2012-04-10 08:58:35

Molecular mechanisms involved in the switch-on of the temperature sensor TRPM2 by hydrogen peroxide have been clarified Macrophages playing an important role in the immune system eat and fight against pathogens and foreign substances in the very beginning of infection. In this condition, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species for sterilization. However, the relation with the temperature sensor was not previously known. Professor Makoto TOMINAGA from National Institute for...

Scientists Uncover Novel Gene's Key Role In Type 2 Diabetes
2012-04-10 03:32:06

Using computational methods, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have strongly implicated a novel gene in the triggering of type-2 diabetes. Their experiments in lab mice and in human blood and tissue samples further showed that this gene not only is associated with the disease, as predicted computationally, but is also likely to play a major causal role. In a study published online April 9 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers combed through...


Latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Reference Libraries

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
2012-05-29 11:19:42

The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1914 as the official journal of the US National Academy of Sciences. The first managing editor of the journal was mathematician Edwin Bidwell Wilson. As of May 2012, the editor-in-chief is Inder M. Verma. PNAS is published weekly in print, and daily online in PNAS Early Edition. The first issue of PNAS was published in 1915, and the journal...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.