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Latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Stories

2012-03-24 03:50:17

The study shows that the lack of Mitofusin 2 in mice produces insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, the main causes of diabetes. Researchers at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have discovered that deficiency of a single protein, Mitofusin 2, in muscle and hepatic cells of mice is sufficient to cause tissues to become insensitive to insulin, thus producing an increase in blood glucose concentrations. These are the two most common conditions prior to...

2012-03-21 14:04:30

Researchers identify the novel expression of an ion channel in neurons of the brain Research at the University of Calgary's Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) has demonstrated the novel expression of an ion channel in Purkinje cells — specialized neurons in the cerebellum, the area of the brain responsible for movement. Ray W. Turner, PhD, Professor in the Department of Cell Biology & Anatomy and PhD student Jordan Engbers and colleagues published this finding in the January edition...

2012-03-21 00:30:56

Scans reveal how genes alter circuit hub to shape temperament -- NIH study A personality profile marked by overly gregarious yet anxious behavior is rooted in abnormal development of a circuit hub buried deep in the front center of the brain, say scientists at the National Institutes of Health. They used three different types of brain imaging to pinpoint the suspect brain area in people with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by these behaviors. Matching the scans to...

2012-03-16 11:26:05

Cap and trade programs to reduce emissions do not inherently provide incentives to induce the private sector to develop innovative technologies to address climate change, according to a new study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In fact, said author Margaret Taylor, a researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) who conducted the study while an assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley's Goldman School of Public...

2012-03-14 13:00:33

Scientists have identified a new compound that rapidly kills hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, the most common form of liver cancer and fifth most common cancer worldwide, while sparing healthy tissue. The compound, Factor Qunolinone Inhibitor 1 (FQI1), works by inhibiting an oncogene originally discovered by a team of researchers led by Devanand Sarkar, M.B.B.S., Ph.D., Harrison Scholar at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Massey Cancer Center, Blick Scholar and assistant professor...

2012-03-13 10:53:28

Army scientists have demonstrated, for the first time, that antibody-based therapies can successfully protect monkeys from the deadly Ebola and Marburg viruses. In addition, the animals were fully protected even when treatment was administered two days post-infection, an accomplishment unmatched by any experimental therapy for these viruses to date. The work appears in this week's electronic edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The filoviruses, Ebola and Marburg,...

2012-03-05 23:23:20

Scientists show that comprehensive ocean planning can maximize profit and minimize conflict The ocean is becoming an increasingly crowded place. New users, such as the wind industry, compete with existing users and interests for space and resources. With the federal mandate for comprehensive ocean planning made explicit in the National Ocean Policy, the need for the transparent evaluation of potential tradeoffs is now greater than ever. A study published in the March 5 Proceedings of...

Upper Class More Likely To Exhibit Unethical Behavior
2012-02-29 04:18:13

The upper class has a higher propensity for unethical behavior, being more likely to believe — as did Gordon Gekko in the movie “Wall Street” — that “greed is good,” according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. In seven separate studies conducted on the UC Berkeley campus, in the San Francisco Bay Area and nationwide, UC Berkeley researchers consistently found that upper-class participants were more likely to lie and cheat when...

2012-02-28 10:45:48

Antisense oligonucleotides — short segments of genetic material designed to target specific areas of a gene or chromosome — that activated an enzyme to "chew up" toxic RNA (ribonucleic acid) could point the way to a treatment for a degenerative muscle disease called myotonic dystrophy, said researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in a report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "This is a proof-of-principle therapy...

2012-02-24 18:00:05

Cells that die naturally generate a lot of internal debris that can trigger the immune system to attack the body, leading to diseases such as lupus. Now Georgia Health Sciences University researchers report that an enzyme known to help keep a woman's immune system from attacking a fetus also helps block development of these autoimmune diseases that target healthy tissues, such as DNA or joints. The findings point toward new treatment strategies for autoimmune diseases, which are on the...


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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
2012-05-29 11:19:42

The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1914 as the official journal of the US National Academy of Sciences. The first managing editor of the journal was mathematician Edwin Bidwell Wilson. As of May 2012, the editor-in-chief is Inder M. Verma. PNAS is published weekly in print, and daily online in PNAS Early Edition. The first issue of PNAS was published in 1915, and the journal...

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