Quantcast
International Space Station Says Goodbye To Russian Progress

International Space Station Says Goodbye To Russian Progress Craft

NASA A Russian space freighter departed the International Space Station Monday, clearing the way for the next express delivery of cargo on Wednesday. The ISS Progress 55 cargo craft undocked from the Pirs docking compartment at 5:44 p.m. EDT...

Latest Progress M-05M Stories

2013-02-04 14:13:28

NASA Television will provide live coverage of the departure of one Russian cargo spacecraft at the International Space Station and the launch and arrival of another. The ISS Progress 48 resupply ship, which arrived at the station last August, will depart the Pirs docking compartment, part of the Russian segment, on Saturday, Feb. 9. The Progress will leave orbit three hours later and burn up above the Pacific Ocean. NASA TV coverage of the undocking will begin at 8 a.m. EST. The undocking...

Russian Progress 49 Cargo Ship Docks With Space Station
2012-11-01 07:15:23

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online After a successful launch at 3:41 a.m. (local time) Wednesday morning from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Russia´s Progress 49 cargo vessel docked with the International Space Station (ISS) nearly six hours later, according to Mission Control. Progress 49 docked automatically to the station´s Zvezda service module at 9:33 a.m. on Halloween, carrying nearly 3 tons of supplies to Expedition 33 crew members....


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
Related