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Latest Prosopagnosia Stories

2013-11-13 13:58:11

Why does it take longer to recognize a familiar face when seen in an unfamiliar setting, like seeing a work colleague when on holiday? A new study published today in Nature Communications has found that part of the reason comes down to the processes that our brain performs when learning and recognizing faces. During the experiment, participants were shown faces of people that they had never seen before, while lying inside an MRI scanner in the Department of Psychology at Royal Holloway...

2012-02-01 15:31:00

For Bradley Duchaine, there is definitely more than meets the eye where faces are concerned. With colleagues at Birkbeck College in the University of London, he is investigating the process of facial recognition, seeking to understand the complexity of what is actually taking place in the brain when one person looks at another. His studies target people who display an inability to recognize faces, a condition long known as prosopagnosia. Duchaine is trying to understand the neural basis...

2011-12-03 11:19:22

“Face recognition is an important social skill, but not all of us are equally good at it,” says Beijing Normal University cognitive psychologist Jia Liu. But what accounts for the difference? A new study by Liu and colleagues Ruosi Wang, Jingguang Li, Huizhen Fang, and Moqian Tian provides the first experimental evidence that the inequality of abilities is rooted in the unique way in which the mind perceives faces. “Individuals who process faces more...

2011-09-08 14:55:21

MPI researchers discover direct connections between the areas of the brain responsible for voice and face recognition Face and voice are the two main features by which we recognise other people. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have now discovered that there is a direct structural connection consisting of fibre pathways between voice- and face-recognition areas in the human brain. The exchange of information, which is assumed to take...

2011-07-14 13:37:43

Unconscious brain activity demonstrated in a case of prosopagnosia Brain damage can cause significant changes in behaviour, such as loss of cognitive skills, but also reveals much about how the nervous system deals with consciousness. New findings reported in the July 2011 issue of Elsevier's Cortex demonstrate how the unconscious brain continues to process information even when the conscious brain is incapacitated. Dr St©phane Simon and collaborators in Professor Alan Pegna's laboratory...

2010-09-10 14:22:29

In our dynamic 3D world, we can encounter a familiar face from any angle and still recognize that face with ease, even if the person has, for example, changed his hair style. This is because our brain has used the 2D snapshots perceived by our eyes (like a camera) to build and store a 3D mental representation of the face, which is resilient to such changes. This is an automatic process that most of us are not consciously aware of, and which appears to be a challenge for people with a...

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2010-07-29 09:53:10

The trouble may be in your neurons, TAU's "Face Lab" discovers A specific area in our brains is responsible for processing information about human and animal faces, both how we recognize them and how we interpret facial expressions. Now, Tel Aviv University research is exploring what makes this highly specialized part of the brain unique, a first step to finding practical applications for that information. In her "Face Lab" at Tel Aviv University, Dr. Galit Yovel of TAU's Department of...

2010-02-11 08:49:06

Acquired prosopagnosia reveals what is special about normal face recognition You stop at a shop window and wonder why someone inside is blatantly staring at you "” until you realize this person is you. Scenarios like this are impossible for us to imagine, but quite common for sufferers of acquired prosopagnosia (AP), a condition which can occur after brain damage, hindering the ability to recognize faces. In a new study published in the March 2010 issue of Elsevier's Cortex, researchers...

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2010-01-20 10:13:37

Finding supports modularity of the mind theory Recognizing faces is an important social skill, but not all of us are equally good at it. Some people are unable to recognize even their closest friends (a condition called prosopagnosia), while others have a near-photographic memory for large numbers of faces. Now a twin study by collaborators at MIT and in Beijing shows that face recognition is heritable, and that it is inherited separately from general intelligence or IQ. This finding plays...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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