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Latest Proterozoic Stories

2011-10-13 20:00:00

CALGARY, Oct. 13, 2011 /PRNewswire/ - (TSXV: ROZ) - Rodinia Oil Corp. ("Rodinia") announces that its 80% owned Mulyawara-1 exploration well reached a total measured depth ("TD") of 2691.3 metres and was officially plugged and abandoned on October 13, 2011. The TD was at the top of the interpreted Mesoproterozoic section. Mulyawara-1 was drilled as a wildcat exploration well far from geologic control. The nearest existing wells with the prospective deep Pindyin sands are approximately...

How Could Life have Survived 'Snowball Earth'
2011-10-11 08:36:07

Global glaciation likely put a chill on life on Earth hundreds of millions of years ago, but new research indicates that simple life in the form of photosynthetic algae could have survived in a narrow body of water with characteristics similar to today's Red Sea. "Under those frigid conditions, there are not a lot of places where you would expect liquid water and light to occur in the same area, and you need both of those things for photosynthetic algae to survive," said Adam Campbell, a...

2011-08-30 09:36:00

CALGARY, Aug. 30, 2011 /PRNewswire/ - (TSX-V: ROZ) - Rodinia Oil Corp. ("Rodinia") today released its financial and operating results for the second quarter of 2011. A copy of Rodinia's unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and related management's discussion and analysis ("MD&A") can be accessed either at www.sedar.com or on Rodinia's website. Second Quarter 2011 Highlights -- On June 9, 2011, Rodinia announced that it had spudded its...

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2011-08-09 09:59:38

The Earth was a much different place 1.1 billion years ago. Researchers are discovering strong evidence that parts of what are now Texas and Antarctica were connected, according to Staci Loewy, a geochemist at California State University, Bakersfield. "I can go to the Franklin Mountains in West Texas and stand next to what was once part of Coats Land in Antarctica," says Loewy, "That's so amazing." Long before the supercontinent Pangaea formed, there were other landforms bouncing around on...

2011-08-04 11:25:00

CALGARY, Aug. 4, 2011 /PRNewswire/ - (TSX-V: ROZ) - Rodinia Oil Corp. ("Rodinia") is pleased to announce that it is preparing to run the second intermediate casing string prior to drilling ahead into prospective formations at "Mulyawara 1", in the Officer Basin of South Australia. Rodinia began drilling Mulyawara 1 on the morning of Thursday June 9, 2011 (Australian Central Standard Time) and reached the first intermediate casing point of 1,525 meters on August 1, 2011. The casing shoe is...

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2011-06-16 05:30:00

According to MIT researchers, new fossils suggest life had a rapid recovery after a global freeze. Researchers at MIT, Harvard University and Smith College discovered hundreds of microscopic fossils in rocks dating back about 710 million years, which is around the time frame that the planet emerged from the "Snowball Earth" event. The team said new fossils are remnants of tiny organisms that survived the harsh post-glacial environment by building armor and reaching out with microscopic...

2011-05-16 15:37:31

A University of Alberta-led research team has discovered that billions of years before life evolved in the oceans, thin layers of microbial matter in shallow water produced enough oxygen to support tiny, mobile life forms. The researchers say worm-like creatures could have lived on the oxygen produced by photosynthetic microbial material, even though oxygen concentrations in the surrounding water were not high enough to support life. The research was conducted in shallow lagoons in Venezuela...

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2010-12-15 05:35:00

Researchers in Britain and Australia have discovered evidence that parts of the open ocean may have experienced a catastrophic global freeze some 700 million years ago, which nearly wiped out life on Earth. The event, dubbed "Snowball Earth", created such turbulent seas that microorganisms barely survived, and created conditions so harsh that most life is believed to have perished, the scientists said. The researchers claim to have found deposits in the remote Flinders Ranges in South...

2010-11-01 09:30:31

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A team of scientists have discovered that evidence linking the "Snowball Earth" glacial events to the emergence of complex life. The Snowball Earth hypothesis states that the Earth was covered from pole to pole by a thick sheet of ice lasting, on several occasions, for millions of years. These glaciations were the most severe in Earth history. They occurred 750 to 580 million years ago. The researchers argue that the oceans in the aftermath of these events were rich in...

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2010-10-27 14:10:00

A spike in ancient marine phosphorus concentrations from 750 to 635 million years ago is linked to emergence of complex life, UC Riverside researchers say A team of scientists, led by biogeochemists at the University of California, Riverside, has found new evidence linking "Snowball Earth" glacial events to the rise of early animals. The controversial Snowball Earth hypothesis posits that the Earth was covered from pole to pole by a thick sheet of ice lasting, on several occasions, for...


Latest Proterozoic Reference Libraries

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-11-18 19:10:56

The Neoproterozoic is the third of three subdivisions of the Proterozoic Eon (occurring from 1 billion years ago to 542 million years ago). This terminal era of the Proterozoic is itself divided into three sub-periods called the Tonian, Cryogenian, and Ediacaran Periods. The most severe glaciation known in the geologic record occurred during the Cryogenian Period, when ice sheets reached the equator and formed a possible “Snowball Earth.” And the earliest fossils of multi-cellular life...

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-11-18 19:08:04

The Paleoproterozoic is the first of three subdivisions of the Proterozoic Eon (occurring from 2.5 billion to 1.6 billion years ago (Ga). This period is marked by the first stabilization of the continents, and also when cyanobacteria--a type of bacteria that uses biochemical processes of photosynthesis to produce oxygen--evolved. Experts have found paleontological evidence that during at least part of the Paleoproterozoic era, about 1.8 Ga, the earth year was about 450 days long, with days...

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-10-22 14:17:38

The Archean (formerly Archaeozoic) is a geologic eon between the Hadean and Proterozoic eons. The Archean Eon begins at roughly 3.8 billion years ago (Ga) and ends at about 2.5 Ga. But unlike all other geological ages, which are based on stratigraphy, The Archean eon is defined chronometrically. The lower boundary of 3.8 Ga has also not been officially recognized by the International Commission on Stratigraphy. The name Archean is derived from the ancient Greek (Arkhe), meaning...

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