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2014-07-07 11:31:38

Syracuse University Geologists in the College of Arts and Sciences have discovered a new way to study oxygen levels in the Earth’s oldest oceans. Zunli Lu and Xiaoli Zhou, an assistant professor and Ph.D. student, respectively, in the Department of Earth Sciences, are part of an international team of researchers whose findings have been published by the journal Geology (Geological Society of America, 2014). Their research approach may have important implications for the study of...

2014-06-30 15:08:17

University of Bristol The impact of the greenhouse gas CO2 on the Earth's temperature is well established by climate models and temperature records over the past 100 years, as well as coupled records of carbon dioxide concentration and temperature throughout Earth history. However, past temperature records have suggested that warming is largely confined to mid-to-high latitudes, especially the poles, whereas tropical temperatures appear to be relatively stable: the tropical thermostat...

Lake Towuti
2014-03-25 12:05:49

Brown University Using sediments from a remote lake, researchers from Brown University have assembled a 60,000-year record of rainfall in central Indonesia. The analysis reveals important new details about the climate history of a region that wields a substantial influence on the global climate as a whole. The Indonesian archipelago sits in the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool, an expanse of ocean that supplies a sizable fraction of the water vapor in Earth's atmosphere and plays a role in...

Recent El Nino Patterns More Active Than In Past 600 Years
2013-10-29 07:31:26

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists from the University of New South Wales, the University of Hawaii International Pacific Research Center and the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory have developed a new approach to analyzing paleo-climate reconstructions of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. Their findings, published in Climate of the Past, resolve disagreements and reveals that ENSO activity during the 20th century has been unusually...

Earthworm Poop Could Help Improve Climate Change Models
2013-07-09 04:49:08

Susan Bowen for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A recent discovery about earthworm excrement could help scientists improve our models of future climate change. Most earthworms excrete balls of calcium carbonate crystals, a chalk-like material. What makes these crystals interesting is that they retain a memory of the temperature at which they were created. Scientists at the Universities of Reading and York conducted an experiment in which earthworms were kept at differing...

Looking Back To Look Forward
2013-05-20 04:57:58

[ Watch the Video: What is Global Warming ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution are looking to events of the past to better understand how rainfall patterns across the Indo-Pacific warm pool — the massive pool of warm water stretching along the equator from Africa to the western Pacific Ocean — will change due to global warming. As part of their study, Pedro...

2013-04-12 15:39:53

Harvard researchers are adding statistical nuance to our understanding of how modern and historical temperatures compare. Through developing a statistical model of Arctic temperature and how it relates to instrumental and proxy records derived from trees, ice cores, and lake sediments, Martin Tingley, a research associate in Harvard's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Peter Huybers, Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences, have shown that the warmest summers in the last two...

Peruvian Ice Cores Reveal History Of Earth's Tropical Climate
2013-04-05 13:11:38

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Earth's tropical climate history has been revealed in unprecedented detail — year by year, for almost 1,800 years — by two annually dated ice cores drawn from the tropical Peruvian Andes. In 2003, a research team led by Ohio State University retrieved core samples from a Peruvian ice cap. They noticed some startling similarities to ice cores they had gathered from Tibet and the Himalayas. Even though the cores were taken...

Record Warming Will Lead To Faster Melting Glaciers And The Loss Looks Irreversible
2013-03-08 08:56:04

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In the next few centuries, Canada's Arctic Archipelago glaciers will melt faster than ever, according to a new study. Research has revealed that 20 percent of the Canadian Arctic glaciers may have disappeared by the end of our current century, leading to an additional sea level rise of 1.4 inches. The findings, funded in part by EU's ice2sea program, are available online and will be published in an upcoming issue of Geophysical...

2012-07-03 10:28:50

Tree ring and oxygen isotope data from the U.S. Pacific Northwest do not provide the same information on past precipitation, but rather than causing a problem, the differing results are a good thing, according to a team of geologists. The researchers are trying to understand the larger spatial patterns and timing of drought in the arid and semiarid areas of the American West. "We generally understand that the Medieval Climate Anomaly, a warm period in much of the northern hemisphere...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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