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Latest Pseudo-nitzschia Stories

Growth Of Toxic Algae Caused By Nitrogen From Pollution And Natural Sources
2013-02-07 10:17:49

San Francisco State University Nitrogen in ocean waters fuels the growth of two tiny but toxic phytoplankton species that are harmful to marine life and human health, warns a new study published in the Journal of Phycology. Researchers from San Francisco State University found that nitrogen entering the ocean -- whether through natural processes or pollution -- boosts the growth and toxicity of a group of phytoplankton that can cause the human illness Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning....

2010-11-11 22:17:03

Findings, which contradict a commonly-proposed approach to reducing global climate change, are published in Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences LSU's Sibel Bargu, along with her former graduate student Ana Garcia, from the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences in LSU's School of the Coast & Environment, has discovered toxic algae in vast, remote regions of the open ocean for the first time. The recent findings were published in the Nov. 8 edition of one of the most...

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2010-03-16 10:20:00

Adding iron to ocean water, believed to be an effective way to absorb carbon dioxide and fight global climate change, could actually be poisoning marine life, claims a new study released Monday. Researchers from the University of Western Ontario, analyzed water samples obtained from open-ocean tracts in the northern Pacific Ocean. They found that the iron stimulated the growth of Pseudo-nitzschia, a type of algae which releases a toxic substance called domoic acid -- a neurotoxin that can...

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2010-02-19 13:40:00

Scientists discover clues into human diseases by studying dolphins in a changing ocean A panel of governmental, academic and non-profit scientists speaking today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) unveiled research suggesting that diseases found in dolphins are similar to human diseases and can provide clues into how human health might be affected by exposure to contaminated coastal water or seafood. "Dolphins and humans are both mammals,...

2009-07-14 15:03:56

Scientists at NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have successfully conducted the first remote detection of a harmful algal species and its toxin below the ocean's surface. The achievement was recently reported in the June issue of Oceanography.This achievement represents a significant milestone in NOAA's effort to monitor the type and toxicity of harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs are considered to be increasing not only...

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2009-03-23 06:55:00

A dangerous nerve toxin emitted by algae off California's coast seems to be distressing creatures in the deep ocean. U.S. researchers believe this poisonous algae is a much larger danger that originally thought. According to a Reuters report, this algea, known as Pseudo-nitzschia, can create hazardous, large amounts of domoic acid. "It's a natural neurotoxin. It is produced by a diatom, which is a phytoplankton. As other animals eat this phytoplankton, like sardines or anchovies, this toxin...

2009-02-02 17:35:17

A new study funded by NOAA and the National Science Foundation reveals that a part of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which separates Washington state from Canada's British Columbia, is a potential "hot spot" for toxic harmful algal blooms affecting the Washington and British Columbia coasts. Understanding where and how these blooms originate and move is critical for accurate forecasts that could provide early warning to protect human and ecosystem health, according to NOAA scientists.Scientists...

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2009-01-31 10:59:47

Rotating water in Strait of Juan de Fuca harbors populations of toxic algae A part of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which separates Washington state from Canada's British Columbia, is a potential "hot spot" for toxic harmful algal blooms affecting the Washington and British Columbia coasts. Marine scientists found that under certain conditions, toxic algal cells from an offshore "initiation site" break off and are transported to nearshore areas, where they may trigger harmful algal blooms that...

2008-08-02 03:00:16

By Julia Scott, San Mateo County Times, Calif. Aug. 2--A large number of dead harbor porpoises have been washing up on beaches in San Mateo County and elsewhere in the Bay Area this summer, and marine mammal experts are at a loss to explain what could be killing them. A total of 24 harbor porpoises -- 12 males, 9 females, and three still in utero -- have been discovered by beachcombers since early June, according to the Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito. More carcasses are likely to show...

2005-09-06 16:28:09

Durham, N.C.  - Duke University Medical Center researchers have found that the naturally occurring marine toxin domoic acid can cause subtle but lasting cognitive damage in rats exposed to the chemical before birth. Humans can become poisoned by the potentially lethal, algal toxin after eating contaminated shellfish. The researchers saw behavioral effects of the toxin in animals after prenatal exposure to domoic acid levels below those generally deemed safe for adults, said Edward...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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