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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest Pseudogap Stories

Study Reveals Origins Of An Exotic Phase Of Matter
2013-11-19 06:34:34

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Understanding superconductivity – whereby certain materials can conduct electricity without any loss of energy – has proved to be one of the most persistent problems in modern physics. Scientists have struggled for decades to develop a cohesive theory of superconductivity, largely spurred by the game-changing prospect of creating a superconductor that works at room temperature, but it has proved to be a tremendous tangle of complex physics. Now...

2013-06-07 13:03:28

2 orders for electrons A German-French research team has constructed a new model that explains how the so-called pseudogap state forms in high-temperature superconductors. The calculations predict two coexisting electron orders. Below a certain temperature, superconductors lose their electrical resistance and can conduct electricity without loss. "It is not to be excluded that the new pseudogap theory also provides the long-awaited explanation for why, in contrast to conventional metallic...

2012-06-21 02:28:36

Iron-based high-temp superconductors show unexpected electronic asymmetry Japanese and U.S. physicists are offering new details this week in the journal Nature regarding intriguing similarities between the quirky electronic properties of a new iron-based high-temperature superconductor (HTS) and its copper-based cousins. While investigating a recently discovered iron-based HTS, the researchers found that its electronic properties were different in the horizontal and vertical directions....

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2011-03-27 10:15:00

Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a puzzling gap in the electronic structures of some high-temperature superconductors could indicate a new phase of matter. Understanding this "pseudogap" has been a 20-year quest for researchers who are trying to control and improve these breakthrough materials, with the ultimate goal of finding superconductors that operate at room temperature."Our findings point to management and control of this other phase as the correct path toward...

2010-07-15 16:10:43

In a major step toward understanding the mysterious "pseudogap" state in high-temperature cuprate superconductors, a team of Cornell, Binghamton University and Brookhaven National Laboratory scientists have found a "broken symmetry," where electrons act like molecules in a liquid crystal: Electrons between copper and oxygen atoms arrange themselves differently "north-south" than "east-west." This simple discovery opens a door to new research that could lead to room-temperature...

2010-07-15 13:22:35

Binghamton University physicist Michael Lawler and his colleagues have made a breakthrough that could lead to advances in superconductors. Their findings will be published this week in the prestigious British journal Nature. The data Lawler analyzed have been available for several years, but have not been well understood until now. "The pattern looked so mysterious and interesting," he said. "It's so different from any other material we've ever looked at. Trying to understand what this data...

2010-07-15 02:52:25

May lead to ways to overcome barrier to room-temperature superconductivity in copper-oxides Scientists have been trying for some 20 years to understand why the low temperature at which copper-oxide superconductors carry current with no resistance can't be increased to be closer to room temperature. Recently, scientists have focused on trying to understand and control an electronic phase called the "pseudogap" phase, which is non-superconducting and is observed at a temperature above the...

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2010-07-08 13:36:41

Scientists at JILA, working with Italian theorists, have discovered another notable similarity between ultracold atomic gases and high-temperature superconductors, suggesting there may be a relatively simple shared explanation for equivalent behaviors of the two very different systems. Described in Nature Physics,* the new research lends more support to the idea that JILA studies of superfluidity (flow with zero friction) in atomic gases may help scientists understand far more complicated...

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2009-06-17 16:05:00

Superconductivity is a unique state in which electrons move freely inside a solid material. This complete lack of electrical resistance could translate to incredibly efficient electric power cables, as well as many other promising technologies.But there's a hitch. Most superconductors become that way only at very low temperatures, often near absolute zero (around -273 degrees Celsius or -460 degrees Fahrenheit). To chill a material enough so that its electrons become "unglued" from their...

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2008-02-13 09:55:00

A better understanding of material could bring 'endless applications'MIT physicists have taken a step toward understanding the puzzling nature of high-temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity with no resistance at temperatures well above absolute zero.If superconductors could be made to work at temperatures as high as room temperature, they could have potentially limitless applications. But first, scientists need to learn much more about how such materials work.Using a...