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Latest Pseudomonas syringae Stories

Work On Microbial Signaling Offers A Window Into Better Biofuels, Human Health
2014-04-25 03:28:23

Tom Rickey, DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory A common plant puts out a welcome mat to bacteria seeking to invade, and scientists have discovered the mat's molecular mix. The study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals new targets during the battle between microbe and host that researchers can exploit to protect plants. The team showed that the humble and oft-studied plant Arabidopsis puts out a molecular signal that invites an...

2011-12-09 11:51:09

A protein called enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) plays a central role in plants' ability to defend themselves from pathogens. But in the almost two decades since it was discovered, how EDS1 works at the molecular level has been a mystery. Solving the mystery will help scientists enhance disease resistance in crops. Two papers published in the Dec. 9 issue of Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/magazine) demonstrate how EDS1 activates different components of the plant immune system,...

2011-11-04 22:51:05

For decades, scientists and farmers have attempted to understand how a bacterial pathogen continues to damage tomatoes despite numerous agricultural attempts to control its spread. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato is the causative agent of bacterial speck disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), a disease that occurs worldwide and causes severe reduction in fruit yield and quality, particularly during cold and wet springs. In the spring of 2010, for example, an outbreak in Florida and...

2011-02-01 21:55:36

Researchers funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) have revealed a novel molecular mechanism that triggers plant infection by Pseudomonas syringae, the bacteria responsible for bacterial speck in tomatoes. The scientists from the Department of Life Sciences at Imperial College London have revealed how two genes in the bacteria work together to launch the infection process that ultimately kills the plant's cells and causes disease, significantly reducing...

2010-06-01 19:18:20

Researchers at the Public University of Navarra, the Polytechnic University of Madrid (CBGP), the University of Malaga, the University of Wisconsin and the Valencian Institute of Agricultural Research have managed to sequence the genome of the bacteria responsible for tuberculosis in the olive tree. The study, included in the June issue of Environmental Microbiology, represents the first sequencing of the genome of a pathogenic bacteria undertaken in Spain, being the first genome known...

2010-04-21 14:50:52

Under the supervision of a Virginia Tech plant pathologist, a group of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students isolated and characterized a formerly unknown group of bacteria. The bacteria strain belongs to the plant pathogen species Pseudomonas syringae. One bacterium of this group, strain 642, was isolated at the Hahn Horticulture Garden and is the first bacterium isolated on the Virginia Tech campus to have its genome sequenced. "I collaborate with John Kowalski's high school...

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2010-04-20 08:29:19

Genome of a bacterium that is threatening the UK's historic landscape and could spread to North America Scientists have decoded the genome of a bacterium that is threatening the UK's historic landscape. The horse chestnut has become an iconic sight in Britain since its introduction in the 1500s but in 2002 a new lethal disease appeared that now infects over 70 per cent of trees in some areas. Bleeding canker, caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pathovar aesculi (Pae), causes lesions...

2009-09-10 14:28:37

Bean plants' natural defences against bacterial infections could be unwittingly driving the evolution of more highly pathogenic bacteria, according to new research published today in Current Biology. The study sheds new light on how bacterial pathogens evolve and adapt to stresses from host plants. This information could help researchers develop new ways of tackling pathogens that cause extensive and costly damage to beans and other food crops. The scientists from Imperial College London and...

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2008-03-04 00:00:00

A study published last week in the journal Science found that snow contains large amounts of Pseudomonas Syringae, a bacteria that can cause disease in bean and tomato plants.  The research showed that even pristine snow from places such as the Yukon and Montana contain large amounts of the bacteria.  However, experts say there is no need for parents whose children play or even eat the newly fallen snow to be overly concerned.  "It's a very ubiquitous bacteria that's...

2005-06-02 23:59:30

COLUMBUS, Ohio "“ Researchers have uncovered the link between two biochemical pathways that plants use to defend themselves against pathogens "“ pathways that scientists have long believed worked independently of each other. Knowing how these pathways of immunity work may one day help researchers breed plants that can better resist a variety of pathogens, said David Mackey, the study's lead author and an assistant professor of horticulture and crop science at Ohio State...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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