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Latest PTEN Stories

2012-03-08 06:12:15

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — We dream of a world where we can eat whatever we like and not worry about the consequences, like weight gain and health issues, and now we might be a step closer. A new study shows mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow and also live longer. In a case study, researchers studied a tumor suppressor commonly lost in human cancers. Mice were given an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene, known as Pten. Not only...

2012-03-06 23:40:22

This result, obtained after five years' research, is published in leading journal Cell Metabolism. The authors, led by Manuel Serrano (CNIO), believe it will open the door to new therapeutic options not only against cancer, but against obesity and even the ageing process. The team has also demonstrated that a synthetic compound developed in-house produces the same anti-obesity benefits in animals as the study gene. Their findings add new weight to a hypothesis that is gaining currency...

2012-03-06 23:05:23

In a perfect world, we could eat to our heart's content without sacrificing our health and good looks, and now it appears that maybe we can. Mice with an extra dose of a known anti-cancer gene lose weight even as their appetites grow. Not only that, but according to the report in the March issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism, the animals also live longer, and that isn't just because they aren't getting cancer, either. One of the animals' youthful secrets is hyperactive brown...

2012-02-01 10:33:46

Hyperconnectivity triggered by loss of PTEN gene can be blocked by treatment with rapamycin New research from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) might help explain how a gene mutation found in some autistic individuals leads to difficulties in processing auditory cues and paying spatial attention to sound. The study has found that when a suspected autism gene called PTEN is deleted from auditory cortical neurons–the main workhorses of the brain's sound-processing...

2012-01-26 12:57:23

Researchers at Queen´s University have identified a possible cause for the loss of a tumour suppressor gene (known as PTEN) that can lead to the development of more aggressive forms of prostate cancer. “This discovery gives us a greater understanding of how aggressive prostate cancer develops because we now have some insight into the mechanism by which the PTEN gene is destroyed,” says Jeremy Squire, a professor in the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine....

2011-12-21 14:59:10

The study shows how normal cells in tumors can enhance the growth of the tumor´s cancer cells after losing an important tumor suppressor gene called Pten.   The findings suggest a new strategy for treating breast cancer by interrupting signals between normal cells and cancer cells in tumors.    A new study published in the journal Nature Cell Biology has discovered how normal cells in tumors can fuel tumor growth.   Led by researchers at the Ohio State...

2011-10-17 13:01:41

Gene promotes prostate cancer when 'turned on,' breast cancer when “turned off” Researchers at Cleveland Clinic have discovered that a gene — known as an androgen receptor (AR) — is found in both prostate and breast cancers yet has opposite effects on these diseases. In prostate cancer, the AR gene promotes cancer growth when the gene is "turned on." In breast cancer, the AR gene promotes cancer growth when the gene is "turned off," as is often the case after...

2011-10-16 21:35:01

Study illuminates the 'dark matter' of the genome Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and two other institutions have uncovered a vast new gene regulatory network in mammalian cells that could explain genetic variability in cancer and other diseases. The studies appear in today's online edition of Cell. "The discovery of this regulatory network fills in a missing piece in the puzzle of cell regulation and allows us to identify genes never before associated with a...

2011-10-13 11:48:28

Scientists have uncovered evidence of powerful new genetic networks and demonstrated how it may work to drive cancer and normal development In findings with major implications for the genetics of cancer and human health, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and two other science teams in New York City and Rome have uncovered evidence of powerful new genetic networks and showed how it may work to drive cancer and normal development. Four papers published online...

2011-09-28 14:47:26

Purdue University scientists believe they have found an effective target for killing late-stage, metastatic prostate cancer cells. Xiaoqi Liu, an assistant professor of biochemistry and member of Purdue's Center for Cancer Research, and graduate student Shawn Liu are focusing on the function of a gene called Polo-like kinase (Plk1), a critical regulator of the cell cycle. Plk1 is also an oncogene, which tends to mutate and can cause cancer. The researchers found that later-stage...


Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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