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Latest PTEN Stories

2010-07-12 13:05:54

U of C scientists find new method to help nerves grow after trauma or injury Faculty of Medicine scientists have discovered a way to enhance nerve regeneration in the peripheral nervous system. This important discovery could lead to new treatments for nerve damage caused by diabetes or traumatic injuries. Peripheral nerves connect the brain and spinal cord to the body, and without them, there is no movement or sensation. Peripheral nerve damage is common and often irreversible. This discovery...

2010-05-13 09:42:07

Researchers at Queen's University have developed a new way of performing lab tests that could improve the way doctors manage prostate cancer treatment. It will allow them to identify with unprecedented accuracy losses of a gene called PTEN that is associated with an aggressive group of prostate cancers. The improved Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) platform uses DNA probes to analyze the three-dimensional space cancer cells occupy in routine clinical microscopic analysis of tissue...

2010-05-10 07:21:45

Researchers in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Thomas Jefferson University have found that the level of a single protein in the tiny roundworm C. elegans determines how long it lives. Worms born without this protein, called arrestin, lived about one-third longer than normal, while worms that had triple the amount of arrestin lived one-third less. The research also showed that arrestin interacts with several other proteins within cells to regulate longevity. The human...

2010-04-19 13:32:23

New research provides crucial insight into the pathogenic mechanisms of Parkinson's disease (PD), a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder. The study appears in the April 19 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology. The identification of inherited mutations in genes such as Parkin and PINK1 ( PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 ) has revealed key factors in the development of familial forms of the disease. Parkin adds ubiquitin molecules to other proteins to trigger their degradation, while PINK1...

2010-04-19 09:23:18

Biopsy MicroRNA that blocks PTEN makes drug less potent against breast cancer WASHINGTON, D.C. - Overexpression of a specific type of microRNA can derail treatment by disabling an important molecular brake on breast cancer cell proliferation, according to evidence presented by researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center at the American Association for Cancer Research 101st Annual Meeting 2010. The study showed that MiRNA-21 interferes with trastuzumab...

2010-03-30 13:52:42

COLUMBUS, Ohio "“ An important gene that normally protects the body against cancer can itself cause a variety of cancers depending on the specific mutation that damages it, according to a new study by investigators at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center-Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC-James). The study examined mutations in a gene called PTEN. People who inherit a mutated copy of this gene have Cowden syndrome, a...

2010-02-09 08:22:31

A team of researchers, led by Pier Paolo Pandolfi, at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, has identified a new type of cellular senescence (i.e., irreversible arrest of cell growth) and determined a way to enhance it to suppress prostate tumor development and growth in mice. Previous work by Pandolfi and colleagues determined that inactivation of the protein Pten leads to a senescence response that opposes tumorigenesis. In this study, Pten-loss"“induced cellular senescence...

2010-01-07 18:42:24

Researchers pinpoint genetic cause of runaway protein synthesis in cells Researchers at the Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research of the Jewish General Hospital and McGill University in Montreal have discovered a previously unsuspected link between two different genetic pathways which suppress the growth of cancer tumors. This breakthrough, they say, could lead to new treatments for some of the deadliest and most intractable forms of cancer; including prostate cancer, brain cancer and...

2009-11-16 08:00:00

JAMAICA PLAIN, Mass., Nov. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Paloma Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced it will give a presentation today at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, "Palomid 529, a dual mTor1/2 inhibitor, efficiently penetrates the blood brain barrier and may be an attractive agent for treatment of glioblastoma" by Dr. Olaf van Tellingen, Ph.D. of The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. (Logo:...

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2009-11-11 06:55:41

Researchers at Queen's University have found a link between two genes involved in cancer formation in humans, by examining the genes in worms. The groundbreaking discovery provides a foundation for how tumor-forming genes interact, and may offer a drug target for cancer treatment. "When cancer hijacks a healthy system, it can create tumors by causing cells to divide when they shouldn't," says Ian Chin-Sang, a developmental biologist at Queen's and lead researcher on the study. "Certain genes...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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