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Small Coral-eating Worm May Mean Big Trouble For Reefs

Small Coral-eating Worm May Mean Big Trouble For Reefs

University of Southampton New research from the University of Southampton has identified a coral-eating flatworm as a potential threat for coral reefs. It is barely possible to see the parasitic worm Amakusaplana acroporae when it sits on...

Latest Pterois Stories

War On Lionfish Can Aid In Recovery Of Native Fish
2014-01-23 14:17:58

Oregon State University It may take a legion of scuba divers armed with nets and spears, but a new study confirms for the first time that controlling lionfish populations in the western Atlantic Ocean can pave the way for a recovery of native fish. Even if it’s one speared fish at a time, it finally appears that there’s a way to fight back. Scientists at Oregon State University, Simon Fraser University and other institutions have shown in both computer models and 18 months of...

2013-10-23 16:21:25

Manned Submersible Inspects Marine Life to Study Rigs to Reefs Program and Completes Record-Setting Series of Dives SEATTLE, Oct. 23, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- OceanGate Inc. (OGI), a global provider of deep-sea manned submersible solutions, has completed a series of dives in the Gulf of Mexico to observe the ecological impact of decommissioned oil platforms on ocean life using the 5-person manned submersible Antipodes. This expedition was part of an initial study related to the "Rigs to...

2013-07-24 23:25:46

The latest blog from PortNoise.com Magazine, a Marble Media LLC online publication, offers a disturbing picture of the rampant spread of the non-native lion fish in the Atlantic Ocean. Fort Lee, NJ (PRWEB) July 24, 2013 An exotic species of fish native to the Pacific and Indian Oceans has been wreaking environmental havoc in the Atlantic Ocean. According to a report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), although they pose no danger to humans, lion fish are fast...

Lionfish Invasion Human Intervention
2013-07-12 13:54:23

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online With almost daily reports detailing how human activities are decimating other species, researchers from the University of North Carolina are making the unique call for human intervention in controlling the Atlantic Ocean's lionfish population. "Lionfish are here to stay, and it appears that the only way to control them is by fishing them," said John Bruno, a UNC biologist and lead investigator in a new study detailing the lack of...

2013-06-18 16:20:28

OceanGate, Nova Southeastern University and Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation Host Three-Day Event to Promote Awareness and Gauge Impact of Lionfish on Florida's Economy and Ocean Habitat SEATTLE, June 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- The latest tool in the battle against Florida's alarming lionfish invasion will be deployed this month at Nova Southeastern University's Oceanographic Center in Port Everglades, Florida. From June 27 to 29, the five-person manned submersible Antipodes will take...

2013-06-18 16:20:25

OceanGate Inc. Hosts Three-Day Event to Promote Awareness and Gauge Impact of Lionfish on Ocean Habitat and Economy SEATTLE, June 18,( )2013 /PRNewswire/ -- OceanGate Inc., a global provider of deep-sea manned submersible solutions, is helping to raise awareness of the widespread invasion of lionfish, a non-native predator known for its venomous spines and increased numbers in the waters of Florida, the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. From June 27 to 29, the five-person manned...

Citizen Science Valuable, Benefits Marine Research Greatly
2013-03-13 12:48:07

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Mobile technology is enabling people to become productive in ways they never thought possible and recently the scientific community has been looking to tap into that productivity by enlisting citizen scientists. To see just how reliable crowd-sourced research can be, a group of international scientists decided to check data collected by citizen scientists against information collected using traditional scientific means and found that...

Florida's Waterways Being Invaded By Pythons, Lionfish And Now Willow Trees
2013-01-08 21:09:24

University of Central Florida Foreign invaders such as pythons and lionfish are not the only threats to Florida's natural habitat. The native Carolina Willow is also starting to strangle portions of the St. Johns River. Biologists at the University of Central Florida recently completed a study that shows this slender tree once used by Native Americans for medicinal purposes, may be thriving because of water-management projects initiated in the 1950s. Canals were built to control runoff...

2012-11-13 08:36:25

Bill sponsor Sen. Kristen Gillibrand seeks to prevent the import of harmful non-native fish and wildlife in her second term WASHINGTON, Nov. 13, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Shortly before Congress broke for its pre-election recess, Sen. Kristen Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) took a major step forward to stop the import of invasive non-native animals when she introduced "The Invasive Fish and Wildlife Prevention Act of 2012" (S. 3606). Now that Congress has reconvened, the recently re-elected...

2012-09-26 10:21:35

Video: Lionfish sighting Non-native predators may impact Gulf ecosystems; endanger fishermen and divers CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas, Sept. 26, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Footage shot by scientists with the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies is the first documented video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8MHwZIBuxE&feature=youtu.be) confirmation that a new non-native marine predator may pose a threat to the ecology of the waters along the Texas coast. Lionfish,...


Latest Pterois Reference Libraries

Biscayne National Park
2013-04-17 23:58:18

Biscayne National Park is located in the southern area of Florida in the United States. The park holds 172,971 acres, of which ninety-five percent consists of water. Native Americans first inhabited the area when water levels were low in the Biscayne Bay. Evidence has been found in the area supporting the inhabitance of other Native Americans, like the Tequesta people, from at least 2,500 years ago. European settlement did not occur in the area until the 19th century, when farmers settled on...

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