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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 7:09 EDT

Latest Public health genomics Stories

2008-09-07 03:00:06

By Chen, Lei-Shih Kwok, Oi-Man; Goodson, Patricia Objectives. We examined US health educators' likelihood of adopting genomic competencies-specific skills and knowledge in public health genomics-into health promotion and the factors influencing such likelihood. Methods. We developed and tested a model to assess likelihood to adopt genomic competencies. Data from 1607 health educators nationwide were collected through a Web-based survey. The model was tested through structural equation...

2008-08-19 12:01:01

Private Access, Inc, and Genetic Alliance, a 501(c)(3) organization, announced today that they have formed a novel public-private partnership designed to simultaneously protect patients' privacy rights while creating a faster and more cost effective way for researchers to connect with patients in order to find causes and treatments for chronic illnesses and diseases. Leaders of both organizations believe that their combined efforts will help transform today's medical research environment,...

2008-06-30 18:03:00

A scientific collaboration aimed at advancing pharmacogenomics research through the development of novel methodologies and advanced reagents for targeted medical resequencing was announced today by Invitrogen Corporation (NASDAQ:IVGN), a provider of essential life science technologies for research, production and diagnostics, and the Genome Quebec and Montreal Heart Institute Pharmacogenomics Centre, a provider of pharmacogenomics research, content, and services. The potential impact of...

2008-06-20 15:00:07

By H. GILBERT WELCH and WYLIE BURKE One relevant question is: What is the point of knowing? THE COMPANY 23andMe promises to "unlock the secrets of your own DNA." Navigenics wants you to be tested to "do everything you can to stay healthy." And deCODEme hopes that genetic testing will "prompt people to do the right thing." It all sounds so good. If you have a couple of thousand dollars to part with (along with some saliva), why not have one of these companies scan your genome? The...

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2008-05-02 13:05:00

Congress passed a landmark anti-genetic discrimination bill on Thursday that forbids insurance companies from setting premiums or determining enrollment eligibility for people whose genetic information shows a predisposition to certain illnesses.Thirteen years after such legislation was first introduced, the House of Representatives passed the bill, 414-1, and sent it to President George W. Bush, who has promised to sign it into law.The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act would bar...

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2008-03-23 07:35:00

Last December, Dr. John Kelsoe, a prominent psychiatric geneticist at the University of California who had spent his entire career identifying the biological roots of bipolar disorder, announced he had discovered several gene mutations closely associated with the disease. Then, Kelsoe, 52, did something unheard of in the world of academic research by selling genetic tests for the condition directly to the public via the Internet for $399.  Psynomics, Kelsoe's La Jolla, CA-based...

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2008-03-18 09:50:00

Although advances in genomic medicine for common adult chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer hold promise for improved prevention, diagnosis and treatment, health professionals and the public are not prepared to effectively integrate these new tools into practice, according to a study released today by researchers from the Department of Veterans Affairs and the RAND Corporation.Physicians and patients are optimistic about the health benefits that genetic testing might...

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2007-04-26 18:28:35

WASHINGTON -- Scientists have found clusters of new gene variants that raise the risk of Type 2 diabetes - and how the researchers did it is as important as what they found. In one of the largest studies yet of human genetic variability, the scientists tested the DNA of more than 32,000 people in five countries to pin down spots that harbor genetic risk factors for this complicated killer. This type of research - called a "genome-wide association" study - promises to usher in a new era of...

2006-05-11 15:21:06

BOSTON (Reuters) - A study covering more than 2,000 patients has identified two genes that are associated with an increased risk of an early heart attack, researchers said on Thursday. Those with the genes had twice the risk of an early-onset heart attack as those without, according to the researchers from the University of California, San Francisco; Cleveland Clinic; Case Western Reserve University; Brigham Young University; and Celera Genomics, which partly funded the research....