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Latest Puget Sound Stories

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2008-07-16 09:00:00

For centuries, the cedar canoes of the Coast Salish Indians have plied the inland waters of Washington state and British Columbia, carrying trading goods, raiding parties and families headed to summer potlatch celebrations. For several weeks this summer, some of the 100 canoes headed to Vancouver Island for an annual gathering also will be trailing sophisticated water-monitoring equipment provided by the U.S. Geological Survey. Every 10 seconds, the $20,000 probes will test the water's...

2008-07-08 12:00:39

By Keith Ervin, Seattle Times Jul. 8--In a case that could determine how far local governments can go in limiting forest-clearing across entire watersheds, a state appeals court ruled Monday that a King County law went too far. Rural property-rights advocates hailed the decision as repudiating excessive regulation, while environmentalists said it could degrade some of the county's most pristine streams and further jeopardize Puget Sound's threatened chinook salmon. A three-judge Court...

2008-07-02 21:00:11

SEATTLE, July 2 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers today issued the last permits needed to reconstruct a dock for loading barges with sand and gravel for transport from an existing mine on Maury Island. "This adds to a long series of findings and permits that clearly indicate our project can proceed while protecting the environment," said Mark Leatham, general manager of Glacier Northwest's Washington operations. "It once again shows that the regulatory agencies and the courts...

2008-06-30 21:02:23

By Warren Cornwall, Seattle Times Jun. 30--People drawn to the beauty of Hood Canal are helping suffocate the very waters that brought them here. Septic systems pumping nitrogen into the southern end of the deep, picturesque fjord, are helping feed a chain reaction resulting in fish kills and depleting the richness of underwater life, scientists announced today. The findings follow three years of intensive work by scientists trying to decipher why the canal has suffered oxygen levels...

2008-06-27 12:02:35

By Susan Gordon, The News Tribune, Tacoma, Wash. Jun. 27--thenewstribune.com Posted online at 3:41 p.m. Thursday Lawmakers in Washington, D.C., are proposing to create a federal office and coordinate stepped-up efforts to alleviate Puget Sound's pollution problems. The Puget Sound Recovery Act of 2008 was introduced Wednesday by U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., and U.S. Rep. Norm Dicks, D-Belfair, according to an announcement from Cantwell's staff. The proposed Puget Sound office...

2008-06-19 12:00:34

By Lynda V. Mapes, Seattle Times Jun. 19--It took several years and $100,000 of staff time to investigate and follow up, but the state Department of Ecology was vindicated last week when a state board upheld its findings against an Everett company the agency fined for piling fill as much as 17 feet deep on 12 acres of wetlands near Marysville. The company, Pacific Topsoils, fought orders to remove the fill and restore the wetlands brought by both Snohomish County and Ecology beginning in...

2007-11-15 12:00:25

By Mark Yuasa, Seattle Times Nov. 15--This is the height of the chum salmon fishing season, and more than 1.4 million fish are expected to flow into Puget Sound and Hood Canal. Right now, many of the traditional places are generating the best action, including Hoodsport in Hood Canal and the Kennedy Creek estuary in Totten Inlet. Other good chum fishing spots are the Johns Creek estuary in Oakland Bay, North Bay near Allyn, Perry Creek in Eld Inlet, Whatcom Creek in Bellingham, Chico...

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2006-04-15 10:11:59

SEATTLE -- A water-loving rodent native to South America that has destroyed thousands of acres of wetlands in the southeast has been spotted near Lake Washington. Nutria are semi-aquatic, chocolate-colored rodents that can weigh more than 20 pounds and eat one-quarter of their weight a day in crops and plants of all varieties. Also called coypu, or swamp rats, they burrow through marshes and levies, and females can produce more than a dozen offspring a year. A trapper recently caught nine...

2006-02-02 18:06:37

SEATTLE -- To like the weather over the past month and a half, some might say, you'd have to be a toad. Not true. You could also be a frog, salamander or other amphibian, judging by the way the critters have been breeding, wildlife experts say. Northern red-legged frogs and long-toed salamanders especially have been have been laying more eggs than usual since the middle of January, apparently after chowing down on an abundance of snails, slugs and other delicacies washing into their lakes...

2005-08-17 07:26:31

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) -- Mud and sand at the bottom of Puget Sound is increasingly tainted by pollution from vehicle exhaust, not heavy industry, a state Department of Ecology study says. The research, which compiled 12 years of sediment test results, showed that toxic metals associated with industrial pollution declined while chemicals tied to vehicle exhaust increased. Margaret Dutch, an Ecology Department scientist who studies marine sediments, said the study is a warning about the...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'