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2014-01-27 10:37:09

And how do separate small elements come together to become a unique and meaningful sequence? When you learn how to play the piano, first you have to learn notes, scales and chords and only then will you be able to play a piece of music. The same principle applies to speech and to reading, where instead of scales you have to learn the alphabet and the rules of grammar. But how do separate small elements come together to become a unique and meaningful sequence? It has been shown that a...

2012-11-27 13:58:22

New MRI technique could help doctors track how patients respond to treatment A new imaging technique developed at MIT offers the first glimpse of the degeneration of two brain structures affected by Parkinson's disease. The technique, which combines several types of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could allow doctors to better monitor patients' progression and track the effectiveness of potential new treatments, says Suzanne Corkin, MIT professor emerita of neuroscience and leader of...

Psychologists Reveal How Brain Performs 'Motor Chunking' Tasks
2012-06-12 15:29:40

You pick up your cell phone and dial the new number of a friend. Ten numbers. One. Number. At. A. Time. Because you haven't actually typed the number before, your brain handles each button press separately, as a sequence of distinct movements. After dialing the number a few more times, you find yourself typing it out as a series of three successive bursts of movement: the area code, the first three numbers and then the last four numbers. Those three separate chunks allow you to type the...

2011-12-30 08:00:00

The Life Sciences Website EurekaMag.com publishes articles in all areas of biological science. The latest articles cover Cerebrum which is a part of the forebrain directing the conscious or volitional motor functions of the body, DAPI which is a fluorescent stain that binds strongly to A-T rich regions in DNA and is extensively in fluorescence microscopy. The article on Isaac Newton covers one of the greatest and most influential physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher,...

2011-10-06 05:46:22

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- "I hate you," are three words the brain of someone who's depressed may not be thinking. A new study published in the October 4th issue of the journal, Molecular Psychiatry, has found that depression seems to uncouple the brain's "Hate Circuit". The hate circuit was first identified in 2008 by UCL Professor Semir Zeki. He found that a circuit connecting three regions in the brain, the superior frontal gyrus, insula and putamen, was activated when test subjects were...

2011-10-04 10:45:47

A new study using MRI scans, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng, from the University of Warwick's Department of Computer Science, has found that depression frequently seems to uncouple the brain's "Hate Circuit". The study entitled "Depression Uncouples Brain Hate Circuit" is published today (Tuesday 4th October 2011) in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. The researchers used MRI scanners to scan the brain activity in 39 depressed people (23 female 16 male) and 37 control subjects who were not...

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2011-04-08 09:37:44

Workers exposed to welding fumes may be at increased risk of damage to the same brain area harmed by Parkinson's disease, according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.Fumes produced by welding contain manganese, an element that scientists have linked to neurological problems including Parkinson's disease-like symptoms."In the United States alone, there are more than 1 million workers who perform welding as a part of their jobs," says Brad...

2011-02-15 06:00:00

SAN DIEGO, Feb. 15, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Ceregene, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company, reported today that its scientists and collaborators have published new experimental findings in support of its Parkinson's disease program which appeared as the lead article in the current issue of Movement Disorders (the official journal of the Movement Disorders Society). The publication reports the first evidence that gene transfer can provide targeted expression of a neurotrophic factor, i.e.,...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.