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Latest Pyroclastic rock Stories

Understanding Mudslides And Other Debris Flows Using mathematics
2014-05-01 03:09:36

Ivy F. Kupec, National Science Foundation Mudslides. Landslides. Volcanic debris flows. Avalanches. Falling rocks... They can come along so suddenly that people, homes, roads and even towns are buried or destroyed without much warning. Recently, we've had dramatic reminders of this, such as the mudslide in Oso, Wash., where 41 people died; an avalanche on Mt. Everest that killed 13 experienced Sherpas and another landslide event in Jackson, Wyo. And as much as ancient Pompeii serves as...

mercury
2014-04-05 05:12:23

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Using new data obtained by the MESSENGER spacecraft, researchers from Brown University in Rhode Island have discovered that explosive volcanic activity has been occurring throughout most of Mercury’s history, meaning that the planet has had the volatile compounds necessary for those eruptions for longer than anticipated. The findings, which are detailed in a recent edition of the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, are...

Volcanic Activity Led To Demise Of Chinese Dinosaurs: Study
2014-02-05 07:45:33

[ Watch the Video: Pyroclastic Eruptions Preserved Fossil Beds In China ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The exceptional preservation and diversity of dinosaur, bird and early mammal fossils present in the fossil beds of northern China are famous. How these creatures died, and why hundreds of creatures from different habitats were buried together on ancient lake floors, has yet to be understood. A new study, published in Nature Communications, claims that the...

2013-12-20 10:18:03

GSA Bulletin articles posted online ahead of print on 6 and 13 December 2013 cover earthquake hazards of the Santa Barbara suburban area; apatite and the skeletons of early animals; the peculiar geological features of Faial (Azores, Portugal); the nature of Mount Rainier; the origin of Pearya terrane, Canada; a re-interpretation of the Chilhowee Group of the Appalachian Blue Ridge; and more. Authors hale from the U.S., Italy, South Africa, and Canada. GSA Bulletin articles published ahead...

Supervolcanic Ash Can Transform Into Lava Miles Away From Eruption
2013-08-28 06:33:27

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research has taken a closer look at how ash produced from supervolcanoes can turn back into lava once it falls back to Earth. Supervolcanoes, such as the Yellowstone caldera, are capable of producing eruptions thousands of times stronger than normal volcanoes. Such a massive eruption can produce an ash cloud that is so hot it has the ability to re-form into lava once it hits the ground much farther away. This evidence was...

Volcanic Eruption Buried Ancient Rhino
2012-11-23 07:09:37

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Although less than two percent of the fossils on earth are preserved in volcanic rock, researchers from the University of Montpellier have identified a new one. They found the skull of a rhino that perished in a volcanic eruption 9.2 million years ago. Found in Turkey, the fossil is thought to be that of a large two-horned rhino (Ceratotherium neumayri) that was common in the Eastern Mediterranean during that period. The unusual...

Pre-eruption Activity In Conduits Affect Volcanic Ejections
2012-07-24 13:53:55

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In addition to being fairly unpredictable, volcanoes can eject a wide range of material, from mile-high plums of black ash to a deadly hail of fist-sized pumice. These ejections travel extremely fast and can reach internal temperatures between 750 to 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit. The prevailing theory has been that the difference in particle size determined when bubbling magma deep below the volcano converts into a rising stream of gas and...

Guatemala On Alert After Fuego Spews Lava And Ash
2012-05-21 07:04:36

Guatemalan authorities raised an alert after the country´s most active volcano, Fuego, began spewing lava and columns of ash into the air at around 2:45 a.m. (0745 GMT) on May 19. Fuego, which overlooks the tourist hotspot of Antigua, shot ash 16,400 feet into the air and spewed lava 1,300 feet high and up to 3,280 feet long, according to a statement by Guatemala´s National Seismology, Vulcanology, Meteorology and Hydrology Institute. The disaster agency´s David de Leon...

Geologists Assess Deep Impacts Of Near-Earth Object Strikes
2011-10-18 08:03:44

Volcanologists from the Universities of Leicester and Durham have forensically reconstructed the impact of a meteorite on Earth and how debris was hurled from the crater to devastate the surrounding region. New research by Mike Branney, of the University of Leicester's Department of Geology, and Richard Brown, University of Durham, shows that some aspects of giant meteorite impacts onto Earth may mimic the behavior of large volcanic eruptions. Meteorite impacts are more common than is...

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2011-06-03 10:45:16

A 3-D model of a volcanic explosion, based on the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington state, may enhance our understanding of how some volcanic explosions occur and help identify of blast zones for potentially dangerous locations, according to an international team of volcanologists. "We took on the modeling of enormously complicated pyroclastic density currents, notably the classic, notorious May 1980 lateral blast that destroyed 500 square kilometers of forested terrain at Mount...


Latest Pyroclastic rock Reference Libraries

28_3226ca8171b89cafa5810af4efc77795
2005-05-25 10:36:46

Volcanic ash is the term for very fine rock and mineral particles less than 2 mm in diameter that are ejected from a volcanic vent. Ash is created when solid rock shatters and magma separates into minute particles during explosive volcanic activity. The usually violent nature of an eruption involving steam (phreatic eruption) results in the magma and perhaps solid rock surrounding the vent, being torn into particles of silt to sand size. The plume that is often seen above an erupting volcano...

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Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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