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Latest Quadrupedalism Stories

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2014-07-18 03:05:22

The University of Texas at Austin Contradicting earlier claims, “The Family That Walks on All Fours,” a group of quadrupedal humans made famous by a 2006 BBC documentary, have simply adapted to their inability to walk upright and do not represent an example of backward evolution, according to new research by Liza Shapiro, an anthropologist at The University of Texas at Austin. Five siblings in the family, who live in a remote corner of Turkey, walk exclusively on their hands and...

Did A Dexterous Hand Or An Agile Foot Evolve First
2013-10-07 11:16:58

RIKEN Resolving a long-standing mystery in human evolution, new research from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute indicates that early hominids developed finger dexterity and tool use ability before the development of bipedal locomotion. Combining monkey and human behavior, brain imaging, and fossil evidence, a research team led by neurobiologist Dr. Atsushi Iriki and including Dr. Gen Suwa, an anthropologist from the University of Tokyo Museum, have overturned the common assumption that...

Bipedal Rodents Survive In The Desert Using Jumps, Hops And Skips
2013-07-07 18:35:07

Society for Experimental Biology [ Video 1 ] [ Video 2 ] Researchers have found that bipedal desert rodents manage to compete with their quadrupedal counterparts by using a diverse set of jumps, hops and skips. A new study, to be presented at the Society for Experimental Biology meeting in Valencia on July 6, suggests that it is this unpredictable movement that allows the bipedal rodents to coexist in Old World deserts with quadrupedal rodents. Research headed by Talia Moore at...

Terrain Played Evolutionary Role To Upright Walking In Humans
2013-05-24 13:22:24

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Archaeologists from the University of York have challenged evolutionary theories about why our ancestors began walking upright. Publishing research in the journal Antiquity, the team wrote that our upright gait may have begun in the rugged landscape of East and South Africa, which was a terrain shaped by volcanoes and shifting tectonic plates. "Our research shows that bipedalism may have developed as a response to the terrain,...

2013-03-13 15:52:17

When, how and why modern humans first stood up and walked on two legs is considered to be one of the greatest missing links in our evolutionary history. Scientists have gone to the far ends of the earth — and the wonderful creatures in it - to look for answers to why we walk the way we walk. In the latest such search, researchers from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg (South Africa) have taken a closer look at bipedal kangaroos and wallabies and how they move...

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2009-07-29 11:13:43

Scientists have discovered that the reason we swing our arms while we walk can be attributed to our body's natural ability to conserve energy. Scientists have long been puzzled over the reasons why humans swing their arms while walking. But a recent study conducted by researchers in the US and the Netherlands appears to have found that answer. They found that it actually requires 12 percent more metabolic energy to hold arms still rather than swinging them while walking. Researchers from the...

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2009-01-26 14:05:34

Despite the fact that most of us see our four-legged friends walking around every day, most of us-including many experts in natural history museums and illustrators for veterinary anatomy text books-apparently still don't know how they do it. A new study published in the January 27th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, shows that anatomists, taxidermists, and toy designers get the walking gait of horses and other quadruped animals wrong about half the time. That's despite the...

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2007-07-16 17:40:00

A new study provides support for the hypothesis that walking on two legs, or bipedalism, evolved because it used less energy than quadrupedal knucklewalking. David Raichlen, an assistant professor of anthropology at The University of Arizona, conducted the study with Michael Sockol from the University of California, Davis, who was the lead author of the paper, and Herman Pontzer from Washington University in St. Louis. Raichlen and his colleagues will publish the article, "Chimpanzee...


Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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