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Latest Quantum dot Stories

2013-06-24 10:33:34

For decades, electronic devices have been getting smaller, and smaller, and smaller. It’s now possible—even routine—to place millions of transistors on a single silicon chip. But transistors based on semiconductors can only get so small. “At the rate the current technology is progressing, in 10 or 20 years, they won’t be able to get any smaller,” said physicist Yoke Khin Yap of Michigan Technological University. “Also, semiconductors have another disadvantage: they waste a...

2013-06-13 16:37:30

It's not reruns of "The Jetsons", but researchers working at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new microscopy technique that uses a process similar to how an old tube television produces a picture–cathodoluminescence–to image nanoscale features. Combining the best features of optical and scanning electron microscopy, the fast, versatile, and high-resolution technique allows scientists to view surface and subsurface features potentially as...

Inkjet-printed Hybrid Quantum Dot LEDs Bring Cheaper, 'Greener' Lighting To Market
2013-06-04 11:52:42

The Optical Society It's not easy going green. For home lighting applications, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) hold the promise of being both environmentally friendly and versatile. Though not as efficient as regular light-emitting diodes (LEDs), they offer a wider range of material choices and are more energy efficient than traditional lights. OLEDs can also be applied to flexible surfaces, which may lead to lights or television displays that can be rolled up and stowed in a pocket....

2013-05-30 23:20:02

The global molecular, atomic and nanoscale imaging market is expected to grow from nearly $3.1 billion in 2011 to $4.4 billion by 2017 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.8% from 2012 to 2017. The increasing aging population and life expectancy, the increasing incidence of chronic diseases, and technological advancements are driving the medical imaging market. Wellesley, MA (PRWEB) May 30, 2013 The global molecular, atomic and nanoscale imaging market is expected to grow from...

2013-05-13 12:47:50

Quantum dots are tiny nanocrystals with extraordinary optical and electrical properties with possible uses in dye production, bioimaging, and solar energy production. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have developed a way to introduce precisely four copper ions into each and every quantum dot. The introduction of these "guest" ions, called doping, opens up possibilities for fine-tuning the optical properties of the quantum dots and producing spectacular colors. "When...

2013-05-09 11:34:06

The latest research from a Kansas State University chemical engineer may help improve humidity and pressure sensors, particularly those used in outer space. Vikas Berry, William H. Honstead professor of chemical engineering, and his research team are using graphene quantum dots to improve sensing devices in a twofold project. The first part involves producing the graphene quantum dots, which are ultrasmall pieces of graphene. Graphene is a single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms and has...

Quantum Internet Prototype In Use At Los Alamos
2013-05-07 15:49:02

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As concerns over cyber security grow with each newly publicized attack, computer scientists have been pursuing quantum technology as a silver bullet against would-be hackers. According to a groundbreaking announcement, scientists at Los Alamos National Labs in New Mexico have been utilizing a small-scale “quantum internet” for the past two years. Quantum cryptography is possible because of the phenomenon known as quantum...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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