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Latest Quantum error correction Stories

2014-06-16 09:20:53

University of Innsbruck Even computers are error-prone. The slightest disturbances may alter saved information and falsify the results of calculations. To overcome these problems, computers use specific routines to continuously detect and correct errors. This also holds true for a future quantum computer, which will require procedures for error correction as well: "Quantum phenomena are extremely fragile and error-prone. Errors can spread rapidly and severely disturb the computer," says...

Superconducting Qubit Array Points The Way To Quantum Computers
2014-04-24 03:15:00

Julie Cohen, UC Santa Barbara A new five-qubit array from UCSB’s Martinis Group is on the threshold of making a quantum computer technologically feasible to build A fully functional quantum computer is one of the holy grails of physics. Unlike conventional computers, the quantum version uses qubits (quantum bits), which make direct use of the multiple states of quantum phenomena. When realized, a quantum computer will be millions of times more powerful at certain computations than...

D-Wave Chip Passes Rigorous Tests
2014-03-05 13:50:44

University of Southern California With cutting-edge technology, sometimes the first step scientists face is just making sure it actually works as intended. The USC Viterbi School of Engineering is home to the USC-Lockheed Martin Quantum Computing Center (QCC), a super-cooled, magnetically shielded facility specially built to house the first commercially available quantum computing processors – devices so advanced that there are only two in use outside the Canadian lab where they were...

Laser Light Yields Versatile Manipulation Of A Quantum Bit
2013-05-01 15:09:02

University of California - Santa Barbara By using light, researchers at UC Santa Barbara have manipulated the quantum state of a single atomic-sized defect in diamond —— the nitrogen-vacancy center —— in a method that not only allows for more unified control than conventional processes, but is more versatile, and opens up the possibility of exploring new solid-state quantum systems. Their results are published in the latest edition of the Proceedings of the National...

Image 1 - Researchers Create Quantum Computer In Diamond
2012-04-06 04:31:03

A girl's best friend has stepped into the digital age as scientists from the University of Southern California have built a quantum computer inside a diamond. The scientists reported in the journal Nature on Thursday that their diamond quantum computer system features two quantum bits, or qubits, made of subatomic particles. Qubits are able to encode a one and a zero at the same time, compared to traditional computer bits, which encode distinctly either a one or a zero. Being able to...

2011-08-31 14:42:52

Thanks to advances in experimental design, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have achieved a record-low probability of error in quantum information processing with a single quantum bit (qubit)–the first published error rate small enough to meet theoretical requirements for building viable quantum computers. A quantum computer could potentially solve certain problems that are intractable using today's technology, even supercomputers. The NIST...

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2011-05-30 08:20:00

Repetitive error correction in a quantum processor A general rule in data processing is that disturbances cause the distortion or deletion of information during data storage or transfer. Methods for conventional computers were developed that automatically identify and correct errors: Data are processed several times and if errors occur, the most likely correct option is chosen. As quantum systems are even more sensitive to environmental disturbances than classical systems, a quantum computer...

2010-11-09 20:48:21

Quantum computers may be much easier to build than previously thought, suggests a new study in Physical Review Letters Quantum computers should be much easier to build than previously thought, because they can still work with a large number of faulty or even missing components, according to a study published today in Physical Review Letters. This surprising discovery brings scientists one step closer to designing and building real-life quantum computing systems "“ devices that could...

2010-09-30 14:38:50

The rules that govern the world of the very small, quantum mechanics, are known for being bizarre. One of the strangest tenets is something called quantum entanglement, in which two or more objects (such as particles of light, called photons) become inextricably linked, so that measuring certain properties of one object reveals information about the other(s), even if they are separated by thousands of miles. Einstein found the consequences of entanglement so unpalatable he famously dubbed it...


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lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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